TattooAftercare.org

By 2g1c2 girls 1 cup

tattoo-aftercare-logo

by on Jun.19, 2014, under

tattoo-aftercare-logo


Comments are closed.

Auto Draft

by on Jun.19, 2014, under Uncategorized


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Sprout: A 10-yr-old’s Tattoo Blog

by on Jun.15, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

tattoosprout.jpgI’ve featured the wild and wonderful tattoos of Kristel Oreto of Crimson Anchor tattoo here before, but today I get to write about her greatest work of art: her daughter Angel who has created one of my new favorite blogs called Tattoo Sprout.

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Human Centipede Tattoo

by on Jun.15, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog, TattooAftercare.org

Human-Centipede-Tattoo.jpg

It was only a matter of time…The Human Centipede Tattoo.

Dakota Milam, projectionist at the Alamo Drafthouse cinema in Austin, has honored his favorite film with its mouth-to-anus logo.

And I really don’t have much more to say about that.

I may go see the film this week. If you’ve seen it, feel free to drop a review in the comments.

Read the rest here: Human Centipede Tattoo

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Photos from Ink-n-Iron

by on Jun.14, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog, TattooAftercare.org

ink-n-iron fest by partywithpanda.jpgI heard that the Ink-n-Iron show in Long Beach this past weekend was a party, and judging from the photos, there must be some major hangovers today.

My favorite photo coverage is by PartyWithPanda.com, whose work is shown above. Check out the whole gallery here.

Go here to read the rest: Photos from Ink-n-Iron

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Kore Flatmo Tattoos

by on Jun.14, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

koreflatmo tattoo.jpg

New work coming in for my next tattoo book is making me giddy, so I figured I’d share some of the exciting art with y’all as a preview.

Here are a couple of images from the wonderful Kore Flatmo of Plurabella Tattoo in Cincinnati, Ohio. In this rare moment, I will refrain from comment and let the tattoo work speak for itself. Check out Kore’s fine art as well.

kore_flatmo_tattoo.jpg

Visit link: Kore Flatmo Tattoos

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Sang Bleu 5 Launch & Exhibtion

by on Jun.14, 2010, under

SB-NY-352x499.jpg

I’ve been a long time fan of Sang Bleu, my first appearance in any sort of publication was in Sang Bleu #0 back in 2006. I recently had the pleasure of finally meeting & being tattooed by Maxime Buechi (Sang Bleu creator) last week.

Sang Bleu is happy and proud to announce its first official event in
NYC! Hosted by Envoy Enterprises, the show will present a selection of
works by Thomas Hooper, renowned tattoo artist and editor of Sang Bleu.
Thomas’ pictorial work although directly complementary to his skin-based
work, sails far from the world of tattooing to explore a very
medium-orientated abstraction. Mixing with ease orthodox and unorthodox
painting techniques, organic textures with computer-enhanced patterns,
accidental stains with geometrical entities, witnessing an undeniable
although alienated legacy from Abstract Expressionism. In addition to
the paintings, a projected composition based of found 8mm footages turn
decay and memory into an abstract artistic language.

The second part of the launch will feature performances curated by
performance artist Jack Ferver whose


Comments are closed.

Chef Tattoos

by on Jun.14, 2010, under

Seamus-Mullen-Boqueria-Courtesy-Food-Network.jpg

It’s not hard to mistake Top Chef with LA Ink, considering both shows are heavy on the tattoos and cheese. It almost seems like high-end NY eateries require full sleeves for a souffle.

Taking a look at the art of chef tattoos is Zagat’s Tattoo Tell-All series.

Aside from the use of “tats” and my usual pet peeve of not naming the tattoo artists behind the work, it’s a good read–particularly the “Ink Insight” section addressing the why question.

Here are some quotes to give you a taste:

“There are a lot of tattooed punk-rock kids in the kitchen because it
has punk-rock energy. If you’re a banker giving out million-dollar
loans, you can’t have a tattoo on your hand, but it’s funny that someone
tattooed, like Nate Appleman, might have a great
career, but some people wouldn’t want to sit next to him on the subway.”
– Jamie Bissonnette, Coppa
and Toro

“Maybe chefs like tats because we are always burning our arms? I’ve
never gotten one to cover a burn but I’ve gotten burned on top of my
tattoos. Gives it a three-dimensional look.”
– Seamus Mullen, Boqueria
[shown right]

“I consider tattoos [to be] art like cooking is an art. My tattoos don’t
scream, ‘look at me, I’m a chef!’ I just like to create little things
that send little messages about who I am as a person. I do the same
thing when I cook.”
– Michael Voltaggio, Langham
Huntington Dining Room

Read more on the Zagat Blog.

UPDATE: LA Weekly also has an extensive article on chef tattoos with a juicy slideshow, including the one below by Amy Scattergood of Carolynn Spence, Chateau Marmont.

chefs-with-tattoos.4912982.87.jpgThanks, Kir Bostic, for the link!


Comments are closed.

Chef Tattoos

by on Jun.11, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

Seamus-Mullen-Boqueria-Courtesy-Food-Network.jpg
It’s not hard to mistake Top Chef with LA Ink, considering both shows are heavy on the tattoos and cheese. It almost seems like high-end NY eateries require full sleeves for a souffle.

Taking a look at the art of chef tattoos is Zagat’s Tattoo Tell-All series.

Aside from the use of “tats” and my usual pet peeve of not naming the tattoo artists behind the work, it’s a good read–particularly the “Ink Insight” section addressing the why question.

Here are some quotes to give you a taste:

“There are a lot of tattooed punk-rock kids in the kitchen because it
has punk-rock energy. If you’re a banker giving out million-dollar
loans, you can’t have a tattoo on your hand, but it’s funny that someone
tattooed, like Nate Appleman, might have a great
career, but some people wouldn’t want to sit next to him on the subway.”
– Jamie Bissonnette, Coppa
and Toro

“Maybe chefs like tats because we are always burning our arms? I’ve
never gotten one to cover a burn but I’ve gotten burned on top of my
tattoos. Gives it a three-dimensional look.”
– Seamus Mullen, Boqueria
[shown right]

“I consider tattoos [to be] art like cooking is an art. My tattoos don’t
scream, ‘look at me, I’m a chef!’ I just like to create little things
that send little messages about who I am as a person. I do the same
thing when I cook.”
– Michael Voltaggio, Langham
Huntington Dining Room

Read more on the Zagat Blog.

UPDATE: LA Weekly also has an extensive article on chef tattoos with a juicy slideshow, including the one below by Amy Scattergood of Carolynn Spence, Chateau Marmont.

chefs-with-tattoos.4912982.87.jpgThanks, Kir Bostic, for the link!

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Chef Tattoos

by on Jun.11, 2010, under

Seamus-Mullen-Boqueria-Courtesy-Food-Network.jpg

It’s not hard to mistake Top Chef with LA Ink, considering both shows are heavy on the tattoos and cheese. It almost seems like high-end NY eateries require full sleeves for a souffle.

Taking a look at the art of chef tattoos is Zagat’s Tattoo Tell-All series.

Aside from the use of “tats” and my usual pet peeve of not naming the tattoo artists behind the work, it’s a good read–particularly the “Ink Insight” section addressing the why question.

Here are some quotes to give you a taste:

“There are a lot of tattooed punk-rock kids in the kitchen because it
has punk-rock energy. If you’re a banker giving out million-dollar
loans, you can’t have a tattoo on your hand, but it’s funny that someone
tattooed, like Nate Appleman, might have a great
career, but some people wouldn’t want to sit next to him on the subway.”
– Jamie Bissonnette, Coppa
and Toro

“Maybe chefs like tats because we are always burning our arms? I’ve
never gotten one to cover a burn but I’ve gotten burned on top of my
tattoos. Gives it a three-dimensional look.”
– Seamus Mullen, Boqueria
[shown right]

“I consider tattoos [to be] art like cooking is an art. My tattoos don’t
scream, ‘look at me, I’m a chef!’ I just like to create little things
that send little messages about who I am as a person. I do the same
thing when I cook.”
– Michael Voltaggio, Langham
Huntington Dining Room

Read more on the Zagat Blog.

UPDATE: LA Weekly also has an extensive article on chef tattoos with a juicy slideshow, including the one below by Amy Scattergood of Carolynn Spence, Chateau Marmont.

chefs-with-tattoos.4912982.87.jpgThanks, Kir Bostic, for the link!


Comments are closed.

"Covered" Documentary: New Clips

by on Jun.10, 2010, under TattooAftercare.org

In April, we posted on the documentary on female tattooists and collectors called Covered.

Now the filmmaker, Dr. Beverly Yuen Thompson, of Snakegirl Productions has released even more clips from the film, including interviews that didn’t make final cut like the video above (found here on YouTube).

As a daughter of an immigrant from a country that is not yet accepting of tattoos (but not paying taxes is ok), I completely relate to this clip of tattooed women who have to deal with the extreme cultural differences between their lives as first generation Americans and their immigrant parents. In one scene, the heavily tattooed Korean woman says that she has not seen her father in three years after revealing that she is tattooed–in my case it was only three months–but the grief of having that separation from one’s family simply because we’ve decorated our skin is not limited to rare cases. I only wish these clips were not on the cutting room floor because the interviews are so powerful, but I’m glad they are available on YouTube.

Check other clips like this one on Jennifer Wilder and her apprenticeship under Johnny Williams of Abstract Art in Webster, TX.

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Sang Bleu 5 Launch & Exhibtion

by on Jun.10, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog, TattooAftercare.org

SB-NY-352x499.jpg

I’ve been a long time fan of Sang Bleu, my first appearance in any sort of publication was in Sang Bleu #0 back in 2006. I recently had the pleasure of finally meeting & being tattooed by Maxime Buechi (Sang Bleu creator) last week.

Sang Bleu is happy and proud to announce its first official event in
NYC! Hosted by Envoy Enterprises, the show will present a selection of
works by Thomas Hooper, renowned tattoo artist and editor of Sang Bleu.
Thomas’ pictorial work although directly complementary to his skin-based
work, sails far from the world of tattooing to explore a very
medium-orientated abstraction. Mixing with ease orthodox and unorthodox
painting techniques, organic textures with computer-enhanced patterns,
accidental stains with geometrical entities, witnessing an undeniable
although alienated legacy from Abstract Expressionism. In addition to
the paintings, a projected composition based of found 8mm footages turn
decay and memory into an abstract artistic language.

The second part of the launch will feature performances curated by
performance artist Jack Ferver whose

:, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Sang Bleu 5 Launch & Exhibtion

by on Jun.10, 2010, under

SB-NY-352x499.jpg

I’ve been a long time fan of Sang Bleu, my first appearance in any sort of publication was in Sang Bleu #0 back in 2006. I recently had the pleasure of finally meeting & being tattooed by Maxime Buechi (Sang Bleu creator) last week.

Sang Bleu is happy and proud to announce its first official event in
NYC! Hosted by Envoy Enterprises, the show will present a selection of
works by Thomas Hooper, renowned tattoo artist and editor of Sang Bleu.
Thomas’ pictorial work although directly complementary to his skin-based
work, sails far from the world of tattooing to explore a very
medium-orientated abstraction. Mixing with ease orthodox and unorthodox
painting techniques, organic textures with computer-enhanced patterns,
accidental stains with geometrical entities, witnessing an undeniable
although alienated legacy from Abstract Expressionism. In addition to
the paintings, a projected composition based of found 8mm footages turn
decay and memory into an abstract artistic language.

The second part of the launch will feature performances curated by
performance artist Jack Ferver whose


Comments are closed.

Sponsored Post: Eikon Device Tattoo Supplies

by on Jun.10, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

Eikon Logo.PNGThe following is a post sponsored by Eikon Device, providers of Tattoo Supplies.

Eikon Device is a leading manufacturer and online distributor of tattoo supplies and equipment. Initially formed in 1994 to research and develop tattoo needles, Eikon Device expanded its scope in 1997 to focus on the technical aspects of tattooing. This change
marked the beginning of many published papers as well as two tattoo inventions: the Eikon Meter and Tru-Spring armature bars.

The success of Eikon Device is largely due to its foundation in science and research. Their continuous focus on tattooing techniques, safety issues and product quality helps tattoo artists make better choices about products and practices.

Eikon Device offers a full catalog of tattoo supplies and equipment:

* Tattoo machines, from FK Irons to Neuma machines and supplies;
* Tattoo ink in five great choices for color:

:, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

N+S PSA [WTF]

by on Jun.10, 2010, under TattooAftercare.org

needlesandsins headquarters.jpgI think I’ve only done one Needles and Sins Public Service Announcement, probably around this time last year, so I guess we’re due for one. Let’s call it an anniversary PSA.

I should first define what a PSA is, I guess. According to Wikipedia, knower of all things, “a typical PSA is
part of a public awareness campaign to inform or educate the
public about an issue such as smoking or compulsive gambling.”

We’d like to address these very issues here. Our message is this:

Smoking, compulsive gambling as well as excessive drinking can be very expensive.
Server fees, travel expenses to conventions, and the cost of our events and swag aside, the real cost of bringing you this content for free is our bar tabs, bookies and a love story that takes place inside a pack of Camels.

Our advertisers are our enablers.

We are selective, however, as to who gets the job of making our lives a cautionary tale. Our latest advertiser is Eikon Device Tattoo Equipment & Supply. They paid for the post below. Now, we’ve been approached by a number of tattoo supply companies who’ve wanted to advertise, and we turned them down because we couldn’t vouch for their stuff–and thus, risk steering you the wrong way so that you never return here. [We also have abandonment issues.] But Eikon has been around for over 13 years. I watched Dan DiMattia make his needles using only Eikon (later switching to their pre-made) and so I knew that top tattooers trusted them. And if Eikon takes money from top tattooists, we’ll take Eikon’s money and promote top tattooists. The circle is complete.

Yes, all this text above is simply to say: Please support our advertisers.

I know, WTF. We could’ve just asked at the start and avoided the verbal foreplay.

One more thing: If you’d like to support N+S beyond advertising, you can throw something in our virtual tip jar.

:, , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Guy Aitchison on Citizen Radio

by on Jun.09, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog, TattooAftercare.org

guy aitchison tattoo hands.jpg

Today, on the wonderful Citizen Radio with Jamie Kilstein and Allison Kilkenny, the featured interview is with Guy Aitchison, “tattoo artist and philosopher” as they call him.

You can hear that interview streamed through Breakthruradio.com.

The “tattoo artist and philosopher” tag is fitting as the podcast touches upon everything from why Guy became a tattoo artist to tattoo myths to fighting greed and commercialism to scientific studies on human behavior to … it gets deep, man. And that’s good because it allows the personality of an iconic tattoo artist to show through beyond the usual questions on tattoos and technique. You feel like you’re really getting to know the artist, and that’s a credit to Allison and Jamie for their light but smart interview style–and all while Jamie is getting his half-sleeve by Guy.

It’s an enjoyable listen even when the conversation gets most serious, and I learned a few things (and will be buying a subscription to New Scientist magazine, which Guy quotes at length).

For more on Guy, hit Hyperspace Studios. You can also see his latest work, shown here, on his Facebook fan page.

guy aitchison tattoo.jpg

View original post here: Guy Aitchison on Citizen Radio

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Guy Aitchison on Citizen Radio

by on Jun.09, 2010, under

guy aitchison tattoo hands.jpg

Today, on the wonderful Citizen Radio with Jamie Kilstein and Allison Kilkenny, the featured interview is with Guy Aitchison, “tattoo artist and philosopher” as they call him.

You can hear that interview streamed through Breakthruradio.com.

The “tattoo artist and philosopher” tag is fitting as the podcast touches upon everything from why Guy became a tattoo artist to tattoo myths to fighting greed and commercialism to scientific studies on human behavior to … it gets deep, man. And that’s good because it allows the personality of an iconic tattoo artist to show through beyond the usual questions on tattoos and technique. You feel like you’re really getting to know the artist, and that’s a credit to Allison and Jamie for their light but smart interview style–and all while Jamie is getting his half-sleeve by Guy.

It’s an enjoyable listen even when the conversation gets most serious, and I learned a few things (and will be buying a subscription to New Scientist magazine, which Guy quotes at length).

For more on Guy, hit Hyperspace Studios. You can also see his latest work, shown here, on his Facebook fan page.

guy aitchison tattoo.jpg

View original post here: Guy Aitchison on Citizen Radio


Comments are closed.

Finger Mustache Tattoos Revisted

by on Jun.09, 2010, under

finger mustache tattoos faux.jpg
^^^^THIS^^^^
not
vvvv THIS vvvv

idiots.jpg
Gama-Go temporary mustache tattoos on sale here for $15. Submit a pic of your faux stache to their photo contest and win prizes, but the greatest win is knowing that you won’t have a permanent shmoosh of ink on your finger forever because of a dumb trend.
Via Boing Boing


Comments are closed.

Finger Mustache Tattoos Revisted

by on Jun.09, 2010, under

finger mustache tattoos faux.jpg
^^^^THIS^^^^
not
vvvv THIS vvvv

idiots.jpg
Gama-Go temporary mustache tattoos on sale here for $15. Submit a pic of your faux stache to their photo contest and win prizes, but the greatest win is knowing that you won’t have a permanent shmoosh of ink on your finger forever because of a dumb trend.
Via Boing Boing


Comments are closed.

Finger Mustache Tattoos Revisted

by on Jun.09, 2010, under

finger mustache tattoos faux.jpg
^^^^THIS^^^^
not
vvvv THIS  vvvv

idiots.jpg
Gama-Go temporary mustache tattoos on sale here for $15. Submit a pic of your faux stache to their photo contest and win prizes, but the greatest win is knowing that you won’t have a permanent shmoosh of ink on your finger forever because of a dumb trend.

Via Boing Boing


Comments are closed.

Finger Mustache Tattoos Revisted

by on Jun.09, 2010, under

finger mustache tattoos faux.jpg


^^^^THIS^^^^
not
vvvv THIS  vvvv

idiots.jpg

Gama-Go temporary mustache tattoos on sale here for $15. Submit a pic of your faux stache to their photo contest and win prizes, but the greatest win is knowing that you won’t have a permanent shmoosh of ink on your finger forever because of a dumb trend.

Via Boing Boing


Comments are closed.

Finger Mustache Tattoos Revisted

by on Jun.09, 2010, under

finger mustache tattoos faux.jpg


^^^^THIS^^^^
not
vvvv THIS


Comments are closed.

Finger Mustache Tattoos Revisted

by on Jun.09, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog, TattooAftercare.org

finger mustache tattoos faux.jpg
^^^^THIS^^^^
not
vvvv THIS vvvv

idiots.jpg
Gama-Go temporary mustache tattoos on sale here for $15. Submit a pic of your faux stache to their photo contest and win prizes, but the greatest win is knowing that you won’t have a permanent shmoosh of ink on your finger forever because of a dumb trend.
Via Boing Boing

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Conventions & Art Show Schedule

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

ink-n-iron photo by nicole reed.jpgInk-n-Iron Fest photo by Nicole Reed

Tattoo events are taking place every thirty seconds throughout the summer, from New Jersey to Taiwan. Here’s our pick list for the next few months to get you planning your own tattoo tour.

June

This weekend, June 11-13th, at the Ink-n-Iron show, custom cars, pin-up girls, Rockabilly bands, and top tattooists converge around and aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA. I’ve been following the road trips of artists and vendors on Twitter as they make their way over for the seventh year of this sleep-less event.


Comments are closed.

Conventions & Art Show Schedule

by on Jun.08, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog, Tattoo News

ink-n-iron photo by nicole reed.jpgInk-n-Iron Fest photo by Nicole Reed

Tattoo events are taking place every thirty seconds throughout the summer, from New Jersey to Taiwan. Here’s our pick list for the next few months to get you planning your own tattoo tour.

June

This weekend, June 11-13th, at the Ink-n-Iron show, custom cars, pin-up girls, Rockabilly bands, and top tattooists converge around and aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA. I’ve been following the road trips of artists and vendors on Twitter as they make their way over for the seventh year of this sleep-less event.

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.08, 2010, under






What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?  Watch the video above and try to come up with something.

Also check Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

The third and fourth are mostly close-ups of tattoos, with a lot of boobs and butts and creative posing. The tattoos include facial work and a big penis in one’s armpit. In Part 5, there are some large gauge nipple and genital piercing, so yeah, not work safe.


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?  Watch the video above and try to come up with something.

Also check Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

The third and fourth are mostly close-ups of tattoos, with a lot of boobs and butts and creative posing. The tattoos include facial work and a big penis in one’s armpit. In Part 5, there are some large gauge nipple and genital piercing, so yeah, not work safe.


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?  Watch the video above and try to come up with something.


Comments are closed.


Comments are closed.

Myke Chambers Tattooing Live on Ustream

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

If you’re interested in the process of tattooing as well as the end result, check Myke Chambers tattooing as a guest artist at House of Pain Tattoo in El Paso, Texas, right now. You can watch Myke tattoo live, and as an added bonus, overhear shop banter.

I’ve seen other Ustream videos by tattooists like Durb Morrison but Myke has been doing these videos pretty regularly lately in his non-stop tattoo tour. [His travel schedule is just exhausting to look at.]


Comments are closed.

Myke Chambers Tattooing Live on Ustream

by on Jun.08, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

If you’re interested in the process of tattooing as well as the end result, check Myke Chambers tattooing as a guest artist at House of Pain Tattoo in El Paso, Texas, right now. You can watch Myke tattoo live, and as an added bonus, overhear shop banter.

I’ve seen other Ustream videos by tattooists like Durb Morrison but Myke has been doing these videos pretty regularly lately in his non-stop tattoo tour. [His travel schedule is just exhausting to look at.]

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Timothy Boor now at Last Rites

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

eddie murphy tattoo.jpg

Just saw that Paul Booth’s Last Rites has added another excellent tattoo artist and painter to their ranks: Timothy Boor, who does exceptional realism, is the new golden child (sorry, couldn’t resist) of the tattoo atelier, leaving Indiana for NYC. Read more about Timothy and his artistic influences on his Last Rites’ page. He’s currently taking appointments.

Read this article: Timothy Boor now at Last Rites


Comments are closed.

Timothy Boor now at Last Rites

by on Jun.08, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

eddie murphy tattoo.jpg

Just saw that Paul Booth’s Last Rites has added another excellent tattoo artist and painter to their ranks: Timothy Boor, who does exceptional realism, is the new golden child (sorry, couldn’t resist) of the tattoo atelier, leaving Indiana for NYC. Read more about Timothy and his artistic influences on his Last Rites’ page. He’s currently taking appointments.

Read this article: Timothy Boor now at Last Rites

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Masterworks of Body Art Exhibition Photos

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

benavides tattoo.jpgA couple of weeks ago, I listed the Masterworks of Body Art exhibit at the Oceanside Museum of Art in
North San Diego in a must-see events post. James Tran, shop manager and apprentice under Bill Canales of Full Circle Tattoo, was there with Bill and clients of the studio, and sent along photos and a quick review of the show.

Check the photos, including the tattoo above by Rob Benavides of Flying Panther Tattoo, on our Flickr set.

Here’s what James had to say about the exhibit:


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.08, 2010, under

What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?


Comments are closed.

I Spied Your Red Heart (Tattoo Mine?)

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

Poetry of body art as spied on craigslist.

Read more: I Spied Your Red Heart (Tattoo Mine?)


Comments are closed.

I Spied Your Red Heart (Tattoo Mine?)

by on Jun.07, 2010, under New York Times

Poetry of body art as spied on craigslist.

Read more: I Spied Your Red Heart (Tattoo Mine?)

:, , , ,

Comments are closed.

First Amendment & Tattoos

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

yer cheatin heart.jpgPhoto of Johnny Anderson by Allen J. Schaben for Los
Angeles Times

In 2006, Johnny Anderson of Yer Cheat’n Heart Tattoo wanted to move his shop to a better location and decided on Hermosa Beach, CA; however, he was denied because zoning laws prohibited tattooing in the city (not as an outright ban but by not recognizing it as a permissible use). Johnny fought back, suing in federal court in LA claiming that his First Amendment rights were violated and that tattooing is protected artistic expression.

He lost that case because the court found that tattooing was a service and “‘not sufficiently imbued with elements
of communication” to be protected as speech.

But Johnny didn’t give up. He appealed to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which recently heard the case, and as the Los
Angeles Times
reports
, “some constitutional law scholars predict the outcome could be different
in what would be the first–and potentially precedent-setting–federal
appellate decision on whether the tattoo artist is engaged in 1st
Amendment-protected activity when designing and applying custom tattoos.”

This means that if Johnny wins, similar oppressive zoning laws–which are some of the biggest obstacles tattooists must overcome in opening up shop across the US–could be challenged with greater success; even better, local officials may think twice before drafting/amending laws to keep tattoo shops out of their districts.

Other tattooists have challenged tattoo bans on other grounds and have won, but in my opinion, this constitutional question is the most interesting and far reaching in its implications:


Does the First Amendment right to free expression protect tattooing?

Here’s what one scholar said to the LA Times:

“If it’s art, it’s art, and art gets protection,” UC Berkeley law professor and 1st Amendment expert Jesse Choper said of the debate over whether tattoos are protected speech. Hermosa Beach might have a chance of prevailing with the 9th Circuit judges, he said, if it imposed
regulations limiting the practice to certain parts of the city or required the involvement of medical professionals. But he said he doubts its total ban on tattoo parlors will pass constitutional review.

The state-wide Massachusetts ban on tattooing was deemed unconstitutional by Judge Barbara Rouse in 2000, who ruled on a civil case brought by a tattooist and the ACLU challenging the ban. In her opinion, Judge Rouse said that tattooing is an ancient art form practiced in almost every culture. She added:

“Persons obtain tattoos to demonstrate commitment to other persons, to institutions, to religious beliefs, and to political and personal beliefs. The medium on which the drawn image appears should not be relevant when determining whether something is ‘speech’; the tattoo itself is symbolic speech deserving of First Amendment protection.”

[...]

“The current ban on tattooing has promoted an underground tattoo
industry with no controls which, in turn, has increased health risks.”

Read more on the Massachusetts tattoo battle in this
New Yorker article
.

That was a state court case, however, and limited in its impact on other bans outside Mass. When a case challenging South Carolina’s tattoo ban, White v. South Carolina, was appealed to the US Supreme Court, the highest court in the country refused to hear it (even with Ken Starr arguing it). The tattoo ban was eventually overturned in 2004. [More on that case here and see the S.C. appellate case here.]

FYI: The last state ban to be overturned was Oklahoma in 2006.

Now, with the 9th Circuit Federal Court of Appeals looking into tattoo protections under the constitution, these local bans might also brought down, and just as important, another court will find tattooing as an art form.

Will keep on eye on it and let you know how it goes.

UPDATE: More legal analysis on HuffPo

Original post: First Amendment & Tattoos


Comments are closed.

Monica Memorial Art Show

by on Jun.07, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

Monicaartshowsacred.jpgIn 2007, tattoo artist and shining light, Monica Henk, was killed. It devastated so many of us. Countless reasons made you want to know Monica:

:, , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Holly Rose Review Final Issue

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

hhr worry.jpg

Our beloved tattoo and poetry journal, Holly Rose Review, has published its last issue but it leaves on its strongest note ever. As always, the poetry is finely curated by Editor and Publisher Theresa Senato Edwards, and the words are illustrated by the tattoo work of Luba Goldina, Maxime Lanouette, and Sean Herman.

The theme of this issue is Worry, as Theresa explains:

The poems share worries of all sorts: impending storms, the world ending, death, failure, germs, and aging. There is also an underlying motif of what transpires in dreams or when one lacks the capability to have them. There are questions of love, of living dishonestly, of
inequality, even a subtle query of the laws of physics.

The art
stuns us with facial expressions; well, let’s face it (pun intended),
the face is the first place where worry seems to land. And there is a vibrancy in the art, capturing
the landscape of worlds filled with a tugging, terror, both real and surreal.

We’re sad to see such a wonderful publication come to an end, but grateful for a project that brought our favorite art forms together so fluidly.

Continue reading here: Holly Rose Review Final Issue


Comments are closed.

Disturbance in The Force: A Tribute To Star Wars

by on Jun.07, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

4521101897_c1d2098ce6.jpg
In celebration of the 30th anniversary of The Empire Strikes Back, this Friday from 7-10 PM, Hope Gallery PresentsDistubance in the Force: A Tribute to the greatest movie series in history: STAR WARS.

The show will feature original works by over 30 renowned artists from all backgrounds including

:, , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

World Record: Most Tattooed Woman

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

most tattooed woman.jpg

I was gonna save this for the monster news review I’ll have up Friday but y’all keep sending me links to the articles, so hell, I might as well put it up now:

Meet the Guinness World Record-holder for the Most Tattooed Woman: Julia Gnuse.

The press has been loving her the past few days because she was in NYC for Book Expo America promoting the Guinness World Records 2011 annual and Gamer’s editions — and she was clearly a colorful attraction. But she also has a particularly interesting story.

As Julia says in this video interview with the BBC, she found tattooing as a way to cope with a skin disorder called Porphyria, which can cause blisters or scarring. Twenty years later, and with 95% of her body covered in various motifs including cartoons and celebrity portraits, the 55-year-old has won her place among Lucky Diamond Rich (Most Tattooed Person) and Isobel Varley (Most Senior Tattooed Woman) in Guinness’s Body Beautiful category.

Julia’s tattoos are mostly done by Art Godoy of Fun House Tattooing, and have cost her about $70,000, according to AOL News.

To see more of her art, check the photo set on Mirror News and in this Reuters video below.

See the rest here: World Record: Most Tattooed Woman


Comments are closed.

Todd Noble Right Coast Tattoo Grand Opening

by on Jun.07, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

l_da7714d0c778e4eeefdad9aa82ad080d.jpg

On Saturday, June 26th tattooer Todd Noble will be celebrating the grand opening of his new shop, Right Coast Tattoo. Big news for the folks of Fenwick Island, DE, but even better, Noble will play host to guest artists Grime, Bert Krak, Civ, Steve Boltz, Eli Quinters and Mike Shea.

There will also be $10 tickets available for the greatest raffle of the decade (next to that Chris Conn raffle) a 4-hour tattoo from Grime. There is also the promise of a pig roast and crab fest, and the festivities are set to go “all day til the wee hours.”

I am well aware that this shindig doesn’t kick off for a few weeks, but we’re giving you ample time to plan here!

Right Coast Tattoo
205 Coastal Highway
Fenwick Island, DE.
302.539.2828

Original post: Todd Noble Right Coast Tattoo Grand Opening

:, , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Wafaa Bilal on NPR

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

bilal.jpgBack in February, we talked about performance artists Wafaa Bilal, who was embarking on a tattoo-based performance-art piece entitled “…And Couting,” in which he would be receiving a tattooed dot – in both black and UV ink – to commemorate the military and civilian casualties in Iraq.

So, seeing as how I’m a “white-noise” freak who keeps WBGO blasting in the living room 24 hours a day and NPR equally cranked in my office here at the Needles and Sins Compound, I was pleased to find out that the latter had done a piece on Bilal.

Click here to read the transcript, see some cool pictures or stream the audio of the segment.

[above photo by Brad Farwell]

Follow this link: Wafaa Bilal on NPR


Comments are closed.

SKIN: Exhibition & Design Competition

by on Jun.07, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

preserved tattoo skin.jpg
The Wellcome Collection in London describes itself as “a free visitor
destination for the incurably curious,” which of course made me curious, incurably so.

Founder Sir Henry Wellcome was a pretty curious dude himself, fascinated by the intersection of medicine and health, business and marketing, philanthropy, culture and art. Wellcome collected over a million objects, including manuscripts, carvings, posters, images and a number of body art artifacts like the preserved
tattooed skin above
, taken off an executed criminal around
1850-1900.

From June 10th to September 26th, The Wellcome Collection presents an exhibition devoted entirely to the largest human organ. Simply entitled Skin, the exhibition delves into “the changing importance of skin, from anatomical
thought in the 16th century through to contemporary artistic
exploration.”

The show includes image galleries, video, a Skin Lab that looks at developments in skin science (including bio-jewelry and clothing), and essays by Javier
Moscoso
, and by Katie
Kitamura
–sister to Horitaka of State of Grace
and author of The
Longshot: A Novel
.

The tattoo portion involves a design competition where the winning artwork will be tattooed live onto Caisa Ederyd (pictured below) at the “Tattoos:
Marks of
meaning”
event on July 22nd.

:, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?


Comments are closed.

Blog Watch: Munewari Minutes (and NY Adorned News)

by on Jun.07, 2010, under

shinji tattoo.jpgI completely geek out over body suits-in-progress blogs, especially when the work is done by tattoo phenomena. [And it seems many of you do too considering the popularity of John Mack’s series on getting tattooed by Horiyoshi III.]

One such blog is Munewari Minutes where Brooklyn’s own Mike Crash posts on the progress of his Japanese backpiece and munewari. As Mike explains in one of his first blog posts,

Munewari (literally ‘chest dividing’) is a tattoo style which
covers the front of the torso while leaving the center of the chest
untouched…The shape is meant to conceal the tattoo when traditional clothing such
as a kimono is worn. As a matter of practicality, I confess the shape has become an
anachronism. You’re not likely to see many folks in kimono
outside of the rare formal occasion. But the style is unique to
Japanese tattoo and I think quite stunning visually, which no doubt has
contributed to it’s longevity–it is still a commonly tattooed style.”

It’s this information on Japanese tattoo, combined with Mike’s own personal experience, that makes Munewari Minutes such an interesting read.

The artist creating the work is the renowned Horizakura, aka Shinji, of the Horitoshi Family. Horizakura has been tattooing Mike–by machine and tebori–for six years at NY Adorned.

The artists of NY Adorned have inspired other tattoo bloggers whom I love like my friend Sarah whose site Evolution of a Backpiece (which we posted here) relays her experience getting tattooed by Stefanie Tamez. Sarah was inspired by the blog (one of the first tattoo-in-progress blogs) of another dear friend, Keith Alexander, who died in July 2005. While his site is no longer online, you can see here
on BME
his backpiece, which was tattooed by Chris O’Donnell, also of Adorned.

shinji tattoo horizakura.jpg
Horizakura will not be at NY Adorned for long, however. As Mike noted in his most recent post, the artist will soon be opening up his own studio on the Lower East Side.

Other big changes are taking place at NYA:


Comments are closed.

Blog Watch: Munewari Minutes (and NY Adorned News)

by on Jun.06, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

shinji tattoo.jpgI completely geek out over body suits-in-progress blogs, especially when the work is done by tattoo phenomena. [And it seems many of you do too considering the popularity of John Mack’s series on getting tattooed by Horiyoshi III.]

One such blog is Munewari Minutes where Brooklyn’s own Mike Crash posts on the progress of his Japanese backpiece and munewari. As Mike explains in one of his first blog posts,

Munewari (literally ‘chest dividing’) is a tattoo style which
covers the front of the torso while leaving the center of the chest
untouched…The shape is meant to conceal the tattoo when traditional clothing such
as a kimono is worn. As a matter of practicality, I confess the shape has become an
anachronism. You’re not likely to see many folks in kimono
outside of the rare formal occasion. But the style is unique to
Japanese tattoo and I think quite stunning visually, which no doubt has
contributed to it’s longevity–it is still a commonly tattooed style.”

It’s this information on Japanese tattoo, combined with Mike’s own personal experience, that makes Munewari Minutes such an interesting read.

The artist creating the work is the renowned Horizakura, aka Shinji, of the Horitoshi Family. Horizakura has been tattooing Mike–by machine and tebori–for six years at NY Adorned.

The artists of NY Adorned have inspired other tattoo bloggers whom I love like my friend Sarah whose site Evolution of a Backpiece (which we posted here) relays her experience getting tattooed by Stefanie Tamez. Sarah was inspired by the blog (one of the first tattoo-in-progress blogs) of another dear friend, Keith Alexander, who died in July 2005. While his site is no longer online, you can see here
on BME
his backpiece, which was tattooed by Chris O’Donnell, also of Adorned.

shinji tattoo horizakura.jpg
Horizakura will not be at NY Adorned for long, however. As Mike noted in his most recent post, the artist will soon be opening up his own studio on the Lower East Side.

Other big changes are taking place at NYA:

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Tattoo designs you’ll regret

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

http://www.happynews.com/living/bodyart/tattoo-designs-youll.htm


Comments are closed.

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

12  Nov

Brandon Bond is one of the most interviewed tattoo artists on the planet. Tattoo artist interviews are usually based on a “paint by numbers” list of uninteresting questions. “What are your influences?” “How long have you been tattooing?” and other retarted inquiries flodded his first 60 articles or so.
In an attempt to avoid this, Brandon posted a request for questions that YOU GUYS wanted to know about on the messageboard form on www.allornothingtattoo.com This is a collection of those quetions and his answers and will be used in the next round of interviews and featured articles worldwide.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Industry News. Date: November 12, 2007, 11:55 am | Comments Off

08  Nov

Tattoo Inks:

The composition of tattoo pigment colors is as follows:

Black – Carbon (India Ink), iron oxide, logwood
Blue – Cobalt aluminate
Brown – Ferric oxide
Green – Chromic oxide, lead chromate, phthalocyanine dyes
Purple – Manganese, aluminum
Red – Mercuric sulfide (cinnabar), sienna (ferric hydrate), sandalwood, brazilwood, organic pigments (aromatic azo compounds)
White – Titanium oxide, zinc oxide
Yellow – Cadmium sulfide

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide (cinnabar). Alternative red dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing Mercury; however, red reactions still continue to be reported. Various allergic reactions can occur, red is usually the color responsible however; yellow, green and blue are the next most common.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Inks. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:43 am | Comments Off

Now, you have your fresh new tattoo, and you want to take good care of it!

Leave That Bandage Alone!

Your artist took the care to cover up your new tattoo for a very good reason – to keep airborn bacteria from invading your wound. Leave the bandage on for a minimum of two hours. Excitement of having a new tattoo will make you want to remove the bandage, but you will just have to wait until later.

Wash and Treat
After you remove the bandage, you will want to wash your tattoo. Use lukewarm water and mild, liquid antibacterial or antimicrobial soap that is fragrance free. Follow with a very light application of your choice of Tattoo treatment. *see below

Specialty Products and Lotions
If you prefer, you can use a specialty product such as H2Ocean. It’s not necessary, as many over the counter products work just fine, but it’s your choice. But remember, H2Ocean was created for the purpose of using their products on a Tattoo. Use the product as directed and continue for 3-5 days.

After that, continue to keep it clean.

A few side notes:

1. While your tattoo is healing try not to soak it while showering, also try to avoid swimming for a few days.

2. PROTECT YOUR TATTOO FROM THE SUN!

3. Do not use petroleum based products

4. Do not use anti-bacterial soaps (except right after getting your tattoo after you unwrap).

5. Do not use moisture creams with fragrance added

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:41 am | Comments Off


Comments are closed.

Tattoo designs you’ll regret

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

http://www.happynews.com/living/bodyart/tattoo-designs-youll.htm


Comments are closed.

Tattoo designs you’ll regret

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

http://www.happynews.com/living/bodyart/tattoo-designs-youll.htm


Comments are closed.

Tattoo designs you’ll regret

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

http://www.happynews.com/living/bodyart/tattoo-designs-youll.htm


Comments are closed.

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

13  Nov

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

Link

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Regrets. Date: November 13, 2007, 7:50 am | Comments Off

12  Nov

Brandon Bond

Brandon Bond is one of the most interviewed tattoo artists on the planet. Tattoo artist interviews are usually based on a “paint by numbers” list of uninteresting questions. “What are your influences?” “How long have you been tattooing?” and other retarted inquiries flodded his first 60 articles or so.
In an attempt to avoid this, Brandon posted a request for questions that YOU GUYS wanted to know about on the messageboard form on www.allornothingtattoo.com This is a collection of those quetions and his answers and will be used in the next round of interviews and featured articles worldwide.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Industry News. Date: November 12, 2007, 11:55 am | Comments Off

08  Nov

Tattoo Inks:

The composition of tattoo pigment colors is as follows:

Black – Carbon (India Ink), iron oxide, logwood
Blue – Cobalt aluminate
Brown – Ferric oxide
Green – Chromic oxide, lead chromate, phthalocyanine dyes
Purple – Manganese, aluminum
Red – Mercuric sulfide (cinnabar), sienna (ferric hydrate), sandalwood, brazilwood, organic pigments (aromatic azo compounds)
White – Titanium oxide, zinc oxide
Yellow – Cadmium sulfide

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide (cinnabar). Alternative red dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing Mercury; however, red reactions still continue to be reported. Various allergic reactions can occur, red is usually the color responsible however; yellow, green and blue are the next most common.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Inks. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:43 am | Comments Off

Now, you have your fresh new tattoo, and you want to take good care of it!

Leave That Bandage Alone!

Your artist took the care to cover up your new tattoo for a very good reason – to keep airborn bacteria from invading your wound. Leave the bandage on for a minimum of two hours. Excitement of having a new tattoo will make you want to remove the bandage, but you will just have to wait until later.

Wash and Treat
After you remove the bandage, you will want to wash your tattoo. Use lukewarm water and mild, liquid antibacterial or antimicrobial soap that is fragrance free. Follow with a very light application of your choice of Tattoo treatment. *see below

Specialty Products and Lotions
If you prefer, you can use a specialty product such as H2Ocean. It’s not necessary, as many over the counter products work just fine, but it’s your choice. But remember, H2Ocean was created for the purpose of using their products on a Tattoo. Use the product as directed and continue for 3-5 days.

After that, continue to keep it clean.

A few side notes:

1. While your tattoo is healing try not to soak it while showering, also try to avoid swimming for a few days.

2. PROTECT YOUR TATTOO FROM THE SUN!

3. Do not use petroleum based products

4. Do not use anti-bacterial soaps (except right after getting your tattoo after you unwrap).

5. Do not use moisture creams with fragrance added

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:41 am | Comments Off


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Aftercare Lotions

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Almost all artists will recommend using lotion after the first few days of healing to keep the skin moist.
This is where it can get a little tricky. All different brands of lotions contain different ingredients. Some that are OK, but some can be very damaging to a new tattoo. Watch the ingredients – lanolin is an ingredient some will use, and lanolin causes allergic reactions in a lot of people. Lanolin is the natural oil that comes from sheep’s wool. Some also contain products such as  bee’s wax or petroleum, which can clog pores and even contain contaminants. First and foremost, your tattoo needs to be clean, and it needs to breathe. If the pores are clogged, its going to cause infection. If you use lotion, find one that is free of dyes and fragrances. H2Ocean Tattoo Aftercare Lotion is specially made tatttoo aftercare ointments have been highly recommended by the artists that use them. (Brandon Bond, Paul Booth, Rhonda Marsh and etc…)

The best thing to do is to listen to your artist. If you experience any problems with the aftercare they recommend, discontinue use immediately. If you already know you are susceptible to allergic reactions, let your artist know and ask them what they would recommend as an alternative. Don’t be stingy because the product they recommend is $3.00 more than something else – your tattoo is going to last you for the rest of your life, especially if you take good care of it. And paying $5.00-$10.00 for aftercare to ensure $500.00 worth of Ink work…… is worth it.


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Aftercare Lotions

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Almost all artists will recommend using lotion after the first few days of healing to keep the skin moist.
This is where it can get a little tricky. All different brands of lotions contain different ingredients. Some that are OK, but some can be very damaging to a new tattoo. Watch the ingredients – lanolin is an ingredient some will use, and lanolin causes allergic reactions in a lot of people. Lanolin is the natural oil that comes from sheep’s wool. Some also contain products such as  bee’s wax or petroleum, which can clog pores and even contain contaminants. First and foremost, your tattoo needs to be clean, and it needs to breathe. If the pores are clogged, its going to cause infection. If you use lotion, find one that is free of dyes and fragrances. H2Ocean Tattoo Aftercare Lotion is specially made tatttoo aftercare ointments have been highly recommended by the artists that use them. (Brandon Bond, Paul Booth, Rhonda Marsh and etc…)

The best thing to do is to listen to your artist. If you experience any problems with the aftercare they recommend, discontinue use immediately. If you already know you are susceptible to allergic reactions, let your artist know and ask them what they would recommend as an alternative. Don’t be stingy because the product they recommend is $3.00 more than something else – your tattoo is going to last you for the rest of your life, especially if you take good care of it. And paying $5.00-$10.00 for aftercare to ensure $500.00 worth of Ink work…… is worth it.


Comments are closed.

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Almost all artists will recommend using lotion after the first few days of healing to keep the skin moist.
This is where it can get a little tricky. All different brands of lotions contain different ingredients. Some that are OK, but some can be very damaging to a new tattoo. Watch the ingredients – lanolin is an ingredient some will use, and lanolin causes allergic reactions in a lot of people. Lanolin is the natural oil that comes from sheep’s wool. Some also contain products such as  bee’s wax or petroleum, which can clog pores and even contain contaminants. First and foremost, your tattoo needs to be clean, and it needs to breathe. If the pores are clogged, its going to cause infection. If you use lotion, find one that is free of dyes and fragrances. H2Ocean Tattoo Aftercare Lotion. Specially made tatttoo aftercare ointments have been highly recommended by the artists that use them. (Brandon Bond, Paul Booth, Rhonda Marsh and etc…)

The best thing to do is to listen to your artist. If you experience any problems with the aftercare they recommend, discontinue use immediately. If you already know you are susceptible to allergic reactions, let your artist know and ask them what they would recommend as an alternative. Don’t be stingy because the product they recommend is $3.00 more than something else – your tattoo is going to last you for the rest of your life, especially if you take good care of it. And paying $5.00-$10.00 for aftercare to ensure $500.00 worth of Ink work…… is worth it.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 14, 2007, 8:02 am | Comments Off

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

Link

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Regrets. Date: November 13, 2007, 7:50 am | Comments Off

12  Nov

Brandon Bond

Brandon Bond is one of the most interviewed tattoo artists on the planet. Tattoo artist interviews are usually based on a “paint by numbers” list of uninteresting questions. “What are your influences?” “How long have you been tattooing?” and other retarted inquiries flodded his first 60 articles or so.
In an attempt to avoid this, Brandon posted a request for questions that YOU GUYS wanted to know about on the messageboard form on www.allornothingtattoo.com This is a collection of those quetions and his answers and will be used in the next round of interviews and featured articles worldwide.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Industry News. Date: November 12, 2007, 11:55 am | Comments Off

08  Nov

Tattoo Inks:

The composition of tattoo pigment colors is as follows:

Black – Carbon (India Ink), iron oxide, logwood
Blue – Cobalt aluminate
Brown – Ferric oxide
Green – Chromic oxide, lead chromate, phthalocyanine dyes
Purple – Manganese, aluminum
Red – Mercuric sulfide (cinnabar), sienna (ferric hydrate), sandalwood, brazilwood, organic pigments (aromatic azo compounds)
White – Titanium oxide, zinc oxide
Yellow – Cadmium sulfide

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide (cinnabar). Alternative red dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing Mercury; however, red reactions still continue to be reported. Various allergic reactions can occur, red is usually the color responsible however; yellow, green and blue are the next most common.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Inks. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:43 am | Comments Off

Now, you have your fresh new tattoo, and you want to take good care of it!

Leave That Bandage Alone!

Your artist took the care to cover up your new tattoo for a very good reason – to keep airborn bacteria from invading your wound. Leave the bandage on for a minimum of two hours. Excitement of having a new tattoo will make you want to remove the bandage, but you will just have to wait until later.

Wash and Treat
After you remove the bandage, you will want to wash your tattoo. Use lukewarm water and mild, liquid antibacterial or antimicrobial soap that is fragrance free. Follow with a very light application of your choice of Tattoo treatment. *see below

Specialty Products and Lotions
If you prefer, you can use a specialty product such as H2Ocean. It’s not necessary, as many over the counter products work just fine, but it’s your choice. But remember, H2Ocean was created for the purpose of using their products on a Tattoo. Use the product as directed and continue for 3-5 days.

After that, continue to keep it clean.

A few side notes:

1. While your tattoo is healing try not to soak it while showering, also try to avoid swimming for a few days.

2. PROTECT YOUR TATTOO FROM THE SUN!

3. Do not use petroleum based products

4. Do not use anti-bacterial soaps (except right after getting your tattoo after you unwrap).

5. Do not use moisture creams with fragrance added

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:41 am | Comments Off


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Removal Options

by on Jun.04, 2010, under

Laser Removal

A laser is used to send pulses of highly concentrated light to break up the ink underneath the top layers of your skin. The laser goes right through the top layers because skin cells are made up of mostly water and melanin, but the larger ink particles absorb the laser’s energy and break into smaller pieces. Your immune system sends scavenger cells to carry off the ink particles, which are now small enough to be dealt with in this way.

Laser removal can be quite painful, and most patients are treated with a local anesthetic gel before the procedure. Blisters and scabs appear on the skin after treatment, and scarring is a possibility. Sessions are scheduled anywhere from three weeks to three months apart, depending on the clinic and how quickly your skin heals afterward. Most tattoos require from one to ten treatments; the average is one to four for home-done tattoos and five to ten for professional tattoos. Treatment session cost anywhere from $250 to $850, and a large and colorful tattoo may cost thousands of dollars to get rid of.

Intense Pulsed Light Therapy

Intense Light Pulse Therapy is the newest and most effective technology used for tattoo removal. IPL works in the same way as laser removal, except a special gel is rubbed on the skin and a wand is used to emit the light pulses. It is also less painful and requires fewer treatments. Unfortunately, it carries a much heftier price tag than laser removal, which is why IPL has not yet replaced traditional lasers. Prices vary, but one clinic charges ten dollars per pulse of light used.

Dermabrasion

Dermabrasion is exactly what it sounds like. The tattooed area is sprayed with a numbing solution, and a grinding tool is used to create abrasive friction that takes off the top layers of skin. Not only does the procedure cause the skin to peel and bleed, it is also very painful and often proves ineffective. Plus, there is always the risk of infection.

Salabrasion

Salabrasion is a centuries-old technique and is just like dermabrasion, except a salt-water solution is applied to the skin before it is abraded.

Excision

Excision is the surgical removal of a tattoo. A local anesthetic is injected, and the tattoo is cut out of the skin. The surrounding skin is then sewn back together. While this would obviously work best for small tattoos, large tattoos can also be excised. The middle part of the tattoo is removed first. After the skin heals, the surrounding areas are cut out until the tattoo is completely gone. Skin grafts are often needed for large tattoo removal. This procedure carries a risk of infection and a very high risk of scarring.


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Removal Options

by on Jun.04, 2010, under


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Documentary from the 70s = Awesome

by on Jun.04, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog






What could be better than discussions and close-ups of tattoos in the seventies set to music my parents had on 8-track tape?  Watch the video above and try to come up with something.

Also check Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

The third and fourth are mostly close-ups of tattoos, with a lot of boobs and butts and creative posing. The tattoos include facial work and a big penis in one’s armpit. In Part 5, there are some large gauge nipple and genital piercing, so yeah, not work safe.

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Wafaa Bilal on NPR

by on Jun.03, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

bilal.jpgBack in February, we talked about performance artists Wafaa Bilal, who was embarking on a tattoo-based performance-art piece entitled “…And Couting,” in which he would be receiving a tattooed dot – in both black and UV ink – to commemorate the military and civilian casualties in Iraq.

So, seeing as how I’m a “white-noise” freak who keeps WBGO blasting in the living room 24 hours a day and NPR equally cranked in my office here at the Needles and Sins Compound, I was pleased to find out that the latter had done a piece on Bilal.

Click here to read the transcript, see some cool pictures or stream the audio of the segment.

[above photo by Brad Farwell]

Follow this link: Wafaa Bilal on NPR

:, , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: January 7, 2008, 8:27 am | Comments Off

Laser Removal

A laser is used to send pulses of highly concentrated light to break up the ink underneath the top layers of your skin. The laser goes right through the top layers because skin cells are made up of mostly water and melanin, but the larger ink particles absorb the laser’s energy and break into smaller pieces. Your immune system sends scavenger cells to carry off the ink particles, which are now small enough to be dealt with in this way.

Laser removal can be quite painful, and most patients are treated with a local anesthetic gel before the procedure. Blisters and scabs appear on the skin after treatment, and scarring is a possibility. Sessions are scheduled anywhere from three weeks to three months apart, depending on the clinic and how quickly your skin heals afterward. Most tattoos require from one to ten treatments; the average is one to four for home-done tattoos and five to ten for professional tattoos. Treatment session cost anywhere from $250 to $850, and a large and colorful tattoo may cost thousands of dollars to get rid of.

Intense Pulsed Light Therapy

Intense Light Pulse Therapy is the newest and most effective technology used for tattoo removal. IPL works in the same way as laser removal, except a special gel is rubbed on the skin and a wand is used to emit the light pulses. It is also less painful and requires fewer treatments. Unfortunately, it carries a much heftier price tag than laser removal, which is why IPL has not yet replaced traditional lasers. Prices vary, but one clinic charges ten dollars per pulse of light used.

Dermabrasion

Dermabrasion is exactly what it sounds like. The tattooed area is sprayed with a numbing solution, and a grinding tool is used to create abrasive friction that takes off the top layers of skin. Not only does the procedure cause the skin to peel and bleed, it is also very painful and often proves ineffective. Plus, there is always the risk of infection.

Salabrasion

Salabrasion is a centuries-old technique and is just like dermabrasion, except a salt-water solution is applied to the skin before it is abraded.

Excision

Excision is the surgical removal of a tattoo. A local anesthetic is injected, and the tattoo is cut out of the skin. The surrounding skin is then sewn back together. While this would obviously work best for small tattoos, large tattoos can also be excised. The middle part of the tattoo is removed first. After the skin heals, the surrounding areas are cut out until the tattoo is completely gone. Skin grafts are often needed for large tattoo removal. This procedure carries a risk of infection and a very high risk of scarring.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Regrets. Date: November 19, 2007, 9:49 am | Comments Off

Almost all artists will recommend using lotion after the first few days of healing to keep the skin moist.
This is where it can get a little tricky. All different brands of lotions contain different ingredients. Some that are OK, but some can be very damaging to a new tattoo. Watch the ingredients – lanolin is an ingredient some will use, and lanolin causes allergic reactions in a lot of people. Lanolin is the natural oil that comes from sheep’s wool. Some also contain products such as  bee’s wax or petroleum, which can clog pores and even contain contaminants. First and foremost, your tattoo needs to be clean, and it needs to breathe. If the pores are clogged, its going to cause infection. If you use lotion, find one that is free of dyes and fragrances. H2Ocean Tattoo Aftercare Lotion. Specially made tatttoo aftercare ointments have been highly recommended by the artists that use them. (Brandon Bond, Paul Booth, Rhonda Marsh and etc…)

The best thing to do is to listen to your artist. If you experience any problems with the aftercare they recommend, discontinue use immediately. If you already know you are susceptible to allergic reactions, let your artist know and ask them what they would recommend as an alternative. Don’t be stingy because the product they recommend is $3.00 more than something else – your tattoo is going to last you for the rest of your life, especially if you take good care of it. And paying $5.00-$10.00 for aftercare to ensure $500.00 worth of Ink work…… is worth it.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 14, 2007, 8:02 am | Comments Off

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

Link

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Regrets. Date: November 13, 2007, 7:50 am | Comments Off

12  Nov

Brandon Bond

Brandon Bond is one of the most interviewed tattoo artists on the planet. Tattoo artist interviews are usually based on a “paint by numbers” list of uninteresting questions. “What are your influences?” “How long have you been tattooing?” and other retarted inquiries flodded his first 60 articles or so.
In an attempt to avoid this, Brandon posted a request for questions that YOU GUYS wanted to know about on the messageboard form on www.allornothingtattoo.com This is a collection of those quetions and his answers and will be used in the next round of interviews and featured articles worldwide.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Industry News. Date: November 12, 2007, 11:55 am | Comments Off

08  Nov

Tattoo Inks:

The composition of tattoo pigment colors is as follows:

Black – Carbon (India Ink), iron oxide, logwood
Blue – Cobalt aluminate
Brown – Ferric oxide
Green – Chromic oxide, lead chromate, phthalocyanine dyes
Purple – Manganese, aluminum
Red – Mercuric sulfide (cinnabar), sienna (ferric hydrate), sandalwood, brazilwood, organic pigments (aromatic azo compounds)
White – Titanium oxide, zinc oxide
Yellow – Cadmium sulfide

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide (cinnabar). Alternative red dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing Mercury; however, red reactions still continue to be reported. Various allergic reactions can occur, red is usually the color responsible however; yellow, green and blue are the next most common.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Inks. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:43 am | Comments Off

Now, you have your fresh new tattoo, and you want to take good care of it!

Leave That Bandage Alone!

Your artist took the care to cover up your new tattoo for a very good reason – to keep airborn bacteria from invading your wound. Leave the bandage on for a minimum of two hours. Excitement of having a new tattoo will make you want to remove the bandage, but you will just have to wait until later.

Wash and Treat
After you remove the bandage, you will want to wash your tattoo. Use lukewarm water and mild, liquid antibacterial or antimicrobial soap that is fragrance free. Follow with a very light application of your choice of Tattoo treatment. *see below

Specialty Products and Lotions
If you prefer, you can use a specialty product such as H2Ocean. It’s not necessary, as many over the counter products work just fine, but it’s your choice. But remember, H2Ocean was created for the purpose of using their products on a Tattoo. Use the product as directed and continue for 3-5 days.

After that, continue to keep it clean.

A few side notes:

1. While your tattoo is healing try not to soak it while showering, also try to avoid swimming for a few days.

2. PROTECT YOUR TATTOO FROM THE SUN!

3. Do not use petroleum based products

4. Do not use anti-bacterial soaps (except right after getting your tattoo after you unwrap).

5. Do not use moisture creams with fragrance added

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:41 am | Comments Off


Comments are closed.

THE TRUTH ABOUT TATTOO AFTERCARE

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

20 Cherry st, Jamestown NY
(716) 487-1243
www.almightytattoo.com

There is NO foolproof set of aftercare instructions for a healing tattoo. Everybody is different and there is always a risk of an allergic reaction or problems. I will do my best to explain a couple of options and will give a few examples of  products and hopefully help troubleshoot any problems you may have..

Here is a list of some aftercare products and their potential risks….

TATTOO AFTERCARE PRODUCTS (TATTOO GOO, INK FIXX, TAT WAX, BLACK CAT, H2OCEAN FOAM, ETC)

I tend to recommend products that have been created by people in the industry specifically for the use of healing a tattoo, but there are a few risks for you to consider and look for. The trend in the tattoo industry is to preach the wonders of the new “miracle product” my advice is to not be a fool to marketing gimmicks, the manufacturer is sure to have a list of reasons as to why their product is superior, the truth of the matter is they have money to make and are more interested in sales than anything else, including the healing of your tattoo, these people are modern day snake oil salesmen, so I’m of the opinion to take the grandiose claims with a grain of salt.. The fact of the matter is ALL of these products have healed some tattoos perfectly and ALL have caused reactions (sometimes severe) in others. All have different ingredience and it is in your best interest to read them and look for anything that you know to be a problem. For example some products contain BEES WAX , common sense will tell you that if you are allergic to bees, it might be a bad idea to use the product….

My personal favorite product is the H2OCEAN FOAM I have seen many fewer (if any) reactions to this than the other aftercare, the foam tends to absorb into the skin, and creates less discharge which in turn seems to produce less scabbing thus smoother healing, the only complaint that I have heard is that it slightly burns a few peoples skin when first applied. I heal all of my tattoos with this product and swear by it, but just because it seems to be the best for me doesn’t mean that you will like it..

OVER THE COUNTER OINTMENTS/CREMES (NEOSPORIN , TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC,  BACITRATION AQUAPHOR, PREPERATION H, NOXEMA, A&D, VITAMIN E OIL, ETC)

I prefer products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare which these are NOT but I will be the first to admit that many tattoos have been successfully healed with all of these over the counter ointments. However the most popular error that people make with these (and all the other aftercare for that matter) is that they over do it ant put far too much of it on their healing tattoo, it is imperative that you put as thin of a layer on your healing tattoo as possible, it is my opinion that ANY product that is PERTOLIUM or LANOLIN based is inferior for healing of tattoos and produce a far greater risk of reaction, excessive seeping and scabbing, thus resulting in color loss. TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC and NEOSPORIN seem to have the highest risk of reaction and if you use them please do so with caution, NEOSPORIN for example used to be considered to be the absolute best in aftercare by the majority of people in the industry.  Some (reputable I might add) artists still swear by it today, but it is a popular opinion that there is a higher rate of reaction (rashes/pimples) and a greater risk of color loss, to be honest I personally am not sure if the critics of NEOSPORIN have their facts straight or have bastardized the product because it is considered “old school”. I am not one of those people that will claim that it is the absolute worst thing you could put on a tattoo, but I’m not an advocate of it either… My opinion of the best OVER THE COUNTER aftercare products are AQUAPHOR, A&D, and BACITRATION (in that order)…. But I honestly wouldn’t use them unless I had to..

OVER THE COUNTER SKIN LOTION (LUBRIDERM,CUREL,VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE,  ETC)

First off if you use any SKIN LOTION for tattoo aftercare it is IMPARITIVE that you only use the name brands recommended and be absolutely sure that they are NON SCENTED and contain NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS!!!! a scented lotion and/or one with artificial color will burn and more than likely cause a reaction. There are reputable artists that recommend nothing but skin lotion for a healing tattoo. And some that recommend the use of LOTION after 3-4 days. Like everything else here many tattoos have been successfully healed with these, HOWEVER I have personally witnessed  the WORST/MORE FREQUENT REACTIONS with Lotions than virtually any other form of aftercare. I have seen large puss filled pimples from these products on some people to an extreme that overshadows anything I have ever witnessed with any ointment or any other kind of aftercare’s bad reaction. I think people tend to completely over do it with this kind of product. And I think there is a lot of room for error when choosing a lotion, such as accidentally getting a scented/colored or an off name inferior product containing elements detrimental to the healing of a tattoo. I have also seen people mistakenly use VASELINE PETROLIUM JELLY (which is horrible for a healing tattoo) because they thought it was the same as VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE. So I recommend that if you are someone that chooses to use lotion for aftercare be very aware of what you are putting on your tattoo and make sure that it is EXACTLY what your artist recommended and even then keep on the watch for reactions.

SIGNES OF A GOOD/NORMAL HEALING TATTOO …… the tattoo will go through a period where they peel, the skin that peels will be the color of the tattoo, and it will literally look like your tattoo is flaking off the more even the tattoo peels the better the tattoo will look when it is completely healed, underneath the peeled skin you will have healing skin cells that will cause the skin to seem milky rather than transparent, don’t worry about this, you tattoo will be bright in no time, it’s all part of the healing process.

SYMPTOMS OF BAD REACTIONS / BAD HEALING CAUSED BY AFTERCARE ….

Aftercare reaction is one of the leading causes of a badly healed tattoo.. Some things to look for are extreme seeping/heavy scabbing,  excessive inflammation, and most of all a rash (little bumps) or excessive pimples. If you think that you are having a reaction to your aftercare it is VERY IMPORTANT that you consult your artist asap, you can save your tattoo if you deal with the situation right away…

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS OF A BAD HEALING TATTOO ……. If you are having a problem with your healing tattoo done at a reputable shop, it more times than not IS your choice of aftercare, a few other things that will cause a tattoo to heal badly are…

NEGLECT – If you don’t practice good personal hygiene, pick your tattoo, let clothing stick to it, scrub your healing tattoo in the shower your tattoo will NOT look nice when it heals, do the right thing and take care of your investment you’re going to have it the rest of your life…

YOUR HEALTH – If you have immunity deficiencies, blood disorders such as diabetes, or are on certain medications such as steroids or blood thinners your tattoo tattoo could be affected, it is a good idea to consult your doctor if you suspect there may be a problem.

SUN EXPOSURE – The sun is your tattoos worst enemy, if you expose your healing tattoo to the sun it can react with the healing ink and literally burn it from the inside out, so UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES expose your healing tattoo to prolonged direct sunlight.  Even a healed tattoo will fade when exposed to the sun or tanning beds with time, if you must expose your HEALED tattoo to those nasty UV rays be sure to use a high SPF SUNBLOCK (at least 30)

EXPOSURE TO TOXINS / BACTERIA – If you work/live in an environment with dirt and filth you run the risk of infection, nursing homes/hospitals, being around animals, toxic metals/chemicals, and filth of all kind can cause a SERIOUS infections, be smart and use common sense …. If you have a tattoo on your hand/forarm and you work on a farm or change a diaper you run the risk of an infection …. The possibilities are endless …….

DAMAGED SKIN – If your skin is week, sun damaged, thin, or an artist overworks the tattoo it will cause the tattoo to heal badly

ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO LATEX OR TATTOO PIGMENT – If you are allergic to latex you will more than likely know before you get your tattoo. Let the artist know, NITREL or VINYL gloves can be used… signs of allergic reactions are extreme rash/redness in the case of latex (gloves worn by the artist)

An allergic reaction to tattoo ink is VERY RARE but is possible, if you are allergic to a pigment it will be evident certain colors in your tattoo bubbling and raising off of your skin resembling a SEVERE scar. If you are concerned about having a reaction to tattoo ink ask your artist about doing a “prick test” where a small dot of each color to be used in your potential artwork is tattooed under your skin at least 24 hours before your tattoo …. If you have a lot of allergies sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry….

I hope this has helped, together we can make your tattoo/healing experience a good one and give you a beautiful piece of living artwork that will last a lifetime…

We will do our part by applying your tattoo to the best of our ability with artistic skill in a clean environment, now please do your part and TAKE CARE OF IT, If you have any questions never hesitate to ask that’s what we’re here for…WE CARE

http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=5502297&blogID=262323041


Comments are closed.

THE TRUTH ABOUT TATTOO AFTERCARE

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

20 Cherry st, Jamestown NY
(716) 487-1243
www.almightytattoo.com

There is NO foolproof set of aftercare instructions for a healing tattoo. Everybody is different and there is always a risk of an allergic reaction or problems. I will do my best to explain a couple of options and will give a few examples of  products and hopefully help troubleshoot any problems you may have..

Here is a list of some aftercare products and their potential risks….

TATTOO AFTERCARE PRODUCTS (TATTOO GOO, INK FIXX, TAT WAX, BLACK CAT, H2OCEAN FOAM, ETC)

I tend to recommend products that have been created by people in the industry specifically for the use of healing a tattoo, but there are a few risks for you to consider and look for. The trend in the tattoo industry is to preach the wonders of the new “miracle product” my advice is to not be a fool to marketing gimmicks, the manufacturer is sure to have a list of reasons as to why their product is superior, the truth of the matter is they have money to make and are more interested in sales than anything else, including the healing of your tattoo, these people are modern day snake oil salesmen, so I’m of the opinion to take the grandiose claims with a grain of salt.. The fact of the matter is ALL of these products have healed some tattoos perfectly and ALL have caused reactions (sometimes severe) in others. All have different ingredience and it is in your best interest to read them and look for anything that you know to be a problem. For example some products contain BEES WAX , common sense will tell you that if you are allergic to bees, it might be a bad idea to use the product….

My personal favorite product is the H2OCEAN FOAM I have seen many fewer (if any) reactions to this than the other aftercare, the foam tends to absorb into the skin, and creates less discharge which in turn seems to produce less scabbing thus smoother healing, the only complaint that I have heard is that it slightly burns a few peoples skin when first applied. I heal all of my tattoos with this product and swear by it, but just because it seems to be the best for me doesn’t mean that you will like it..

OVER THE COUNTER OINTMENTS/CREMES (NEOSPORIN , TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC,  BACITRATION AQUAPHOR, PREPERATION H, NOXEMA, A&D, VITAMIN E OIL, ETC)

I prefer products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare which these are NOT but I will be the first to admit that many tattoos have been successfully healed with all of these over the counter ointments. However the most popular error that people make with these (and all the other aftercare for that matter) is that they over do it ant put far too much of it on their healing tattoo, it is imperative that you put as thin of a layer on your healing tattoo as possible, it is my opinion that ANY product that is PERTOLIUM or LANOLIN based is inferior for healing of tattoos and produce a far greater risk of reaction, excessive seeping and scabbing, thus resulting in color loss. TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC and NEOSPORIN seem to have the highest risk of reaction and if you use them please do so with caution, NEOSPORIN for example used to be considered to be the absolute best in aftercare by the majority of people in the industry.  Some (reputable I might add) artists still swear by it today, but it is a popular opinion that there is a higher rate of reaction (rashes/pimples) and a greater risk of color loss, to be honest I personally am not sure if the critics of NEOSPORIN have their facts straight or have bastardized the product because it is considered “old school”. I am not one of those people that will claim that it is the absolute worst thing you could put on a tattoo, but I’m not an advocate of it either… My opinion of the best OVER THE COUNTER aftercare products are AQUAPHOR, A&D, and BACITRATION (in that order)…. But I honestly wouldn’t use them unless I had to..

OVER THE COUNTER SKIN LOTION (LUBRIDERM,CUREL,VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE,  ETC)

First off if you use any SKIN LOTION for tattoo aftercare it is IMPARITIVE that you only use the name brands recommended and be absolutely sure that they are NON SCENTED and contain NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS!!!! a scented lotion and/or one with artificial color will burn and more than likely cause a reaction. There are reputable artists that recommend nothing but skin lotion for a healing tattoo. And some that recommend the use of LOTION after 3-4 days. Like everything else here many tattoos have been successfully healed with these, HOWEVER I have personally witnessed  the WORST/MORE FREQUENT REACTIONS with Lotions than virtually any other form of aftercare. I have seen large puss filled pimples from these products on some people to an extreme that overshadows anything I have ever witnessed with any ointment or any other kind of aftercare’s bad reaction. I think people tend to completely over do it with this kind of product. And I think there is a lot of room for error when choosing a lotion, such as accidentally getting a scented/colored or an off name inferior product containing elements detrimental to the healing of a tattoo. I have also seen people mistakenly use VASELINE PETROLIUM JELLY (which is horrible for a healing tattoo) because they thought it was the same as VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE. So I recommend that if you are someone that chooses to use lotion for aftercare be very aware of what you are putting on your tattoo and make sure that it is EXACTLY what your artist recommended and even then keep on the watch for reactions.

SIGNES OF A GOOD/NORMAL HEALING TATTOO …… the tattoo will go through a period where they peel, the skin that peels will be the color of the tattoo, and it will literally look like your tattoo is flaking off the more even the tattoo peels the better the tattoo will look when it is completely healed, underneath the peeled skin you will have healing skin cells that will cause the skin to seem milky rather than transparent, don’t worry about this, you tattoo will be bright in no time, it’s all part of the healing process.

SYMPTOMS OF BAD REACTIONS / BAD HEALING CAUSED BY AFTERCARE ….

Aftercare reaction is one of the leading causes of a badly healed tattoo.. Some things to look for are extreme seeping/heavy scabbing,  excessive inflammation, and most of all a rash (little bumps) or excessive pimples. If you think that you are having a reaction to your aftercare it is VERY IMPORTANT that you consult your artist asap, you can save your tattoo if you deal with the situation right away…

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS OF A BAD HEALING TATTOO ……. If you are having a problem with your healing tattoo done at a reputable shop, it more times than not IS your choice of aftercare, a few other things that will cause a tattoo to heal badly are…

NEGLECT – If you don’t practice good personal hygiene, pick your tattoo, let clothing stick to it, scrub your healing tattoo in the shower your tattoo will NOT look nice when it heals, do the right thing and take care of your investment you’re going to have it the rest of your life…

YOUR HEALTH – If you have immunity deficiencies, blood disorders such as diabetes, or are on certain medications such as steroids or blood thinners your tattoo tattoo could be affected, it is a good idea to consult your doctor if you suspect there may be a problem.

SUN EXPOSURE – The sun is your tattoos worst enemy, if you expose your healing tattoo to the sun it can react with the healing ink and literally burn it from the inside out, so UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES expose your healing tattoo to prolonged direct sunlight.  Even a healed tattoo will fade when exposed to the sun or tanning beds with time, if you must expose your HEALED tattoo to those nasty UV rays be sure to use a high SPF SUNBLOCK (at least 30)

EXPOSURE TO TOXINS / BACTERIA – If you work/live in an environment with dirt and filth you run the risk of infection, nursing homes/hospitals, being around animals, toxic metals/chemicals, and filth of all kind can cause a SERIOUS infections, be smart and use common sense …. If you have a tattoo on your hand/forarm and you work on a farm or change a diaper you run the risk of an infection …. The possibilities are endless …….

DAMAGED SKIN – If your skin is week, sun damaged, thin, or an artist overworks the tattoo it will cause the tattoo to heal badly

ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO LATEX OR TATTOO PIGMENT – If you are allergic to latex you will more than likely know before you get your tattoo. Let the artist know, NITREL or VINYL gloves can be used… signs of allergic reactions are extreme rash/redness in the case of latex (gloves worn by the artist)

An allergic reaction to tattoo ink is VERY RARE but is possible, if you are allergic to a pigment it will be evident certain colors in your tattoo bubbling and raising off of your skin resembling a SEVERE scar. If you are concerned about having a reaction to tattoo ink ask your artist about doing a “prick test” where a small dot of each color to be used in your potential artwork is tattooed under your skin at least 24 hours before your tattoo …. If you have a lot of allergies sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry….

I hope this has helped, together we can make your tattoo/healing experience a good one and give you a beautiful piece of living artwork that will last a lifetime…

We will do our part by applying your tattoo to the best of our ability with artistic skill in a clean environment, now please do your part and TAKE CARE OF IT, If you have any questions never hesitate to ask that’s what we’re here for…WE CARE

http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=5502297&blogID=262323041


Comments are closed.

THE TRUTH ABOUT TATTOO AFTERCARE

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

20 Cherry st, Jamestown NY
(716) 487-1243
www.almightytattoo.com

There is NO foolproof set of aftercare instructions for a healing tattoo. Everybody is different and there is always a risk of an allergic reaction or problems. I will do my best to explain a couple of options and will give a few examples of  products and hopefully help troubleshoot any problems you may have..

Here is a list of some aftercare products and their potential risks….

TATTOO AFTERCARE PRODUCTS (TATTOO GOO, INK FIXX, TAT WAX, BLACK CAT, H2OCEAN FOAM, ETC)

I tend to recommend products that have been created by people in the industry specifically for the use of healing a tattoo, but there are a few risks for you to consider and look for. The trend in the tattoo industry is to preach the wonders of the new “miracle product” my advice is to not be a fool to marketing gimmicks, the manufacturer is sure to have a list of reasons as to why their product is superior, the truth of the matter is they have money to make and are more interested in sales than anything else, including the healing of your tattoo, these people are modern day snake oil salesmen, so I’m of the opinion to take the grandiose claims with a grain of salt.. The fact of the matter is ALL of these products have healed some tattoos perfectly and ALL have caused reactions (sometimes severe) in others. All have different ingredience and it is in your best interest to read them and look for anything that you know to be a problem. For example some products contain BEES WAX , common sense will tell you that if you are allergic to bees, it might be a bad idea to use the product….

My personal favorite product is the H2OCEAN FOAM I have seen many fewer (if any) reactions to this than the other aftercare, the foam tends to absorb into the skin, and creates less discharge which in turn seems to produce less scabbing thus smoother healing, the only complaint that I have heard is that it slightly burns a few peoples skin when first applied. I heal all of my tattoos with this product and swear by it, but just because it seems to be the best for me doesn’t mean that you will like it..

OVER THE COUNTER OINTMENTS/CREMES (NEOSPORIN , TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC,  BACITRATION AQUAPHOR, PREPERATION H, NOXEMA, A&D, VITAMIN E OIL, ETC)

I prefer products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare which these are NOT but I will be the first to admit that many tattoos have been successfully healed with all of these over the counter ointments. However the most popular error that people make with these (and all the other aftercare for that matter) is that they over do it ant put far too much of it on their healing tattoo, it is imperative that you put as thin of a layer on your healing tattoo as possible, it is my opinion that ANY product that is PERTOLIUM or LANOLIN based is inferior for healing of tattoos and produce a far greater risk of reaction, excessive seeping and scabbing, thus resulting in color loss. TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC and NEOSPORIN seem to have the highest risk of reaction and if you use them please do so with caution, NEOSPORIN for example used to be considered to be the absolute best in aftercare by the majority of people in the industry.  Some (reputable I might add) artists still swear by it today, but it is a popular opinion that there is a higher rate of reaction (rashes/pimples) and a greater risk of color loss, to be honest I personally am not sure if the critics of NEOSPORIN have their facts straight or have bastardized the product because it is considered “old school”. I am not one of those people that will claim that it is the absolute worst thing you could put on a tattoo, but I’m not an advocate of it either… My opinion of the best OVER THE COUNTER aftercare products are AQUAPHOR, A&D, and BACITRATION (in that order)…. But I honestly wouldn’t use them unless I had to..

OVER THE COUNTER SKIN LOTION (LUBRIDERM,CUREL,VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE,  ETC)

First off if you use any SKIN LOTION for tattoo aftercare it is IMPARITIVE that you only use the name brands recommended and be absolutely sure that they are NON SCENTED and contain NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS!!!! a scented lotion and/or one with artificial color will burn and more than likely cause a reaction. There are reputable artists that recommend nothing but skin lotion for a healing tattoo. And some that recommend the use of LOTION after 3-4 days. Like everything else here many tattoos have been successfully healed with these, HOWEVER I have personally witnessed  the WORST/MORE FREQUENT REACTIONS with Lotions than virtually any other form of aftercare. I have seen large puss filled pimples from these products on some people to an extreme that overshadows anything I have ever witnessed with any ointment or any other kind of aftercare’s bad reaction. I think people tend to completely over do it with this kind of product. And I think there is a lot of room for error when choosing a lotion, such as accidentally getting a scented/colored or an off name inferior product containing elements detrimental to the healing of a tattoo. I have also seen people mistakenly use VASELINE PETROLIUM JELLY (which is horrible for a healing tattoo) because they thought it was the same as VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE. So I recommend that if you are someone that chooses to use lotion for aftercare be very aware of what you are putting on your tattoo and make sure that it is EXACTLY what your artist recommended and even then keep on the watch for reactions.

SIGNES OF A GOOD/NORMAL HEALING TATTOO …… the tattoo will go through a period where they peel, the skin that peels will be the color of the tattoo, and it will literally look like your tattoo is flaking off the more even the tattoo peels the better the tattoo will look when it is completely healed, underneath the peeled skin you will have healing skin cells that will cause the skin to seem milky rather than transparent, don’t worry about this, you tattoo will be bright in no time, it’s all part of the healing process.

SYMPTOMS OF BAD REACTIONS / BAD HEALING CAUSED BY AFTERCARE ….

Aftercare reaction is one of the leading causes of a badly healed tattoo.. Some things to look for are extreme seeping/heavy scabbing,  excessive inflammation, and most of all a rash (little bumps) or excessive pimples. If you think that you are having a reaction to your aftercare it is VERY IMPORTANT that you consult your artist asap, you can save your tattoo if you deal with the situation right away…

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS OF A BAD HEALING TATTOO ……. If you are having a problem with your healing tattoo done at a reputable shop, it more times than not IS your choice of aftercare, a few other things that will cause a tattoo to heal badly are…

NEGLECT – If you don’t practice good personal hygiene, pick your tattoo, let clothing stick to it, scrub your healing tattoo in the shower your tattoo will NOT look nice when it heals, do the right thing and take care of your investment you’re going to have it the rest of your life…

YOUR HEALTH – If you have immunity deficiencies, blood disorders such as diabetes, or are on certain medications such as steroids or blood thinners your tattoo tattoo could be affected, it is a good idea to consult your doctor if you suspect there may be a problem.

SUN EXPOSURE – The sun is your tattoos worst enemy, if you expose your healing tattoo to the sun it can react with the healing ink and literally burn it from the inside out, so UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES expose your healing tattoo to prolonged direct sunlight.  Even a healed tattoo will fade when exposed to the sun or tanning beds with time, if you must expose your HEALED tattoo to those nasty UV rays be sure to use a high SPF SUNBLOCK (at least 30)

EXPOSURE TO TOXINS / BACTERIA – If you work/live in an environment with dirt and filth you run the risk of infection, nursing homes/hospitals, being around animals, toxic metals/chemicals, and filth of all kind can cause a SERIOUS infections, be smart and use common sense …. If you have a tattoo on your hand/forarm and you work on a farm or change a diaper you run the risk of an infection …. The possibilities are endless …….

DAMAGED SKIN – If your skin is week, sun damaged, thin, or an artist overworks the tattoo it will cause the tattoo to heal badly

ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO LATEX OR TATTOO PIGMENT – If you are allergic to latex you will more than likely know before you get your tattoo. Let the artist know, NITREL or VINYL gloves can be used… signs of allergic reactions are extreme rash/redness in the case of latex (gloves worn by the artist)

An allergic reaction to tattoo ink is VERY RARE but is possible, if you are allergic to a pigment it will be evident certain colors in your tattoo bubbling and raising off of your skin resembling a SEVERE scar. If you are concerned about having a reaction to tattoo ink ask your artist about doing a “prick test” where a small dot of each color to be used in your potential artwork is tattooed under your skin at least 24 hours before your tattoo …. If you have a lot of allergies sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry….

I hope this has helped, together we can make your tattoo/healing experience a good one and give you a beautiful piece of living artwork that will last a lifetime…

We will do our part by applying your tattoo to the best of our ability with artistic skill in a clean environment, now please do your part and TAKE CARE OF IT, If you have any questions never hesitate to ask that’s what we’re here for…WE CARE

http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=5502297&blogID=262323041


Comments are closed.

THE TRUTH ABOUT TATTOO AFTERCARE

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

20 Cherry st, Jamestown NY
(716) 487-1243
www.almightytattoo.com

There is NO foolproof set of aftercare instructions for a healing tattoo. Everybody is different and there is always a risk of an allergic reaction or problems. I will do my best to explain a couple of options and will give a few examples of  products and hopefully help troubleshoot any problems you may have..

Here is a list of some aftercare products and their potential risks….

TATTOO AFTERCARE PRODUCTS (TATTOO GOO, INK FIXX, TAT WAX, BLACK CAT, H2OCEAN FOAM, ETC)

I tend to recommend products that have been created by people in the industry specifically for the use of healing a tattoo, but there are a few risks for you to consider and look for. The trend in the tattoo industry is to preach the wonders of the new “miracle product” my advice is to not be a fool to marketing gimmicks, the manufacturer is sure to have a list of reasons as to why their product is superior, the truth of the matter is they have money to make and are more interested in sales than anything else, including the healing of your tattoo, these people are modern day snake oil salesmen, so I’m of the opinion to take the grandiose claims with a grain of salt.. The fact of the matter is ALL of these products have healed some tattoos perfectly and ALL have caused reactions (sometimes severe) in others. All have different ingredience and it is in your best interest to read them and look for anything that you know to be a problem. For example some products contain BEES WAX , common sense will tell you that if you are allergic to bees, it might be a bad idea to use the product….

My personal favorite product is the H2OCEAN FOAM I have seen many fewer (if any) reactions to this than the other aftercare, the foam tends to absorb into the skin, and creates less discharge which in turn seems to produce less scabbing thus smoother healing, the only complaint that I have heard is that it slightly burns a few peoples skin when first applied. I heal all of my tattoos with this product and swear by it, but just because it seems to be the best for me doesn’t mean that you will like it..

OVER THE COUNTER OINTMENTS/CREMES (NEOSPORIN , TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC,  BACITRATION AQUAPHOR, PREPERATION H, NOXEMA, A&D, VITAMIN E OIL, ETC)

I prefer products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare which these are NOT but I will be the first to admit that many tattoos have been successfully healed with all of these over the counter ointments. However the most popular error that people make with these (and all the other aftercare for that matter) is that they over do it ant put far too much of it on their healing tattoo, it is imperative that you put as thin of a layer on your healing tattoo as possible, it is my opinion that ANY product that is PERTOLIUM or LANOLIN based is inferior for healing of tattoos and produce a far greater risk of reaction, excessive seeping and scabbing, thus resulting in color loss. TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC and NEOSPORIN seem to have the highest risk of reaction and if you use them please do so with caution, NEOSPORIN for example used to be considered to be the absolute best in aftercare by the majority of people in the industry.  Some (reputable I might add) artists still swear by it today, but it is a popular opinion that there is a higher rate of reaction (rashes/pimples) and a greater risk of color loss, to be honest I personally am not sure if the critics of NEOSPORIN have their facts straight or have bastardized the product because it is considered “old school”. I am not one of those people that will claim that it is the absolute worst thing you could put on a tattoo, but I’m not an advocate of it either… My opinion of the best OVER THE COUNTER aftercare products are AQUAPHOR, A&D, and BACITRATION (in that order)…. But I honestly wouldn’t use them unless I had to..

OVER THE COUNTER SKIN LOTION (LUBRIDERM,CUREL,VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE,  ETC)

First off if you use any SKIN LOTION for tattoo aftercare it is IMPARITIVE that you only use the name brands recommended and be absolutely sure that they are NON SCENTED and contain NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS!!!! a scented lotion and/or one with artificial color will burn and more than likely cause a reaction. There are reputable artists that recommend nothing but skin lotion for a healing tattoo. And some that recommend the use of LOTION after 3-4 days. Like everything else here many tattoos have been successfully healed with these, HOWEVER I have personally witnessed  the WORST/MORE FREQUENT REACTIONS with Lotions than virtually any other form of aftercare. I have seen large puss filled pimples from these products on some people to an extreme that overshadows anything I have ever witnessed with any ointment or any other kind of aftercare’s bad reaction. I think people tend to completely over do it with this kind of product. And I think there is a lot of room for error when choosing a lotion, such as accidentally getting a scented/colored or an off name inferior product containing elements detrimental to the healing of a tattoo. I have also seen people mistakenly use VASELINE PETROLIUM JELLY (which is horrible for a healing tattoo) because they thought it was the same as VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE. So I recommend that if you are someone that chooses to use lotion for aftercare be very aware of what you are putting on your tattoo and make sure that it is EXACTLY what your artist recommended and even then keep on the watch for reactions.

SIGNES OF A GOOD/NORMAL HEALING TATTOO …… the tattoo will go through a period where they peel, the skin that peels will be the color of the tattoo, and it will literally look like your tattoo is flaking off the more even the tattoo peels the better the tattoo will look when it is completely healed, underneath the peeled skin you will have healing skin cells that will cause the skin to seem milky rather than transparent, don’t worry about this, you tattoo will be bright in no time, it’s all part of the healing process.

SYMPTOMS OF BAD REACTIONS / BAD HEALING CAUSED BY AFTERCARE ….

Aftercare reaction is one of the leading causes of a badly healed tattoo.. Some things to look for are extreme seeping/heavy scabbing,  excessive inflammation, and most of all a rash (little bumps) or excessive pimples. If you think that you are having a reaction to your aftercare it is VERY IMPORTANT that you consult your artist asap, you can save your tattoo if you deal with the situation right away…

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS OF A BAD HEALING TATTOO ……. If you are having a problem with your healing tattoo done at a reputable shop, it more times than not IS your choice of aftercare, a few other things that will cause a tattoo to heal badly are…

NEGLECT – If you don’t practice good personal hygiene, pick your tattoo, let clothing stick to it, scrub your healing tattoo in the shower your tattoo will NOT look nice when it heals, do the right thing and take care of your investment you’re going to have it the rest of your life…

YOUR HEALTH – If you have immunity deficiencies, blood disorders such as diabetes, or are on certain medications such as steroids or blood thinners your tattoo tattoo could be affected, it is a good idea to consult your doctor if you suspect there may be a problem.

SUN EXPOSURE – The sun is your tattoos worst enemy, if you expose your healing tattoo to the sun it can react with the healing ink and literally burn it from the inside out, so UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES expose your healing tattoo to prolonged direct sunlight.  Even a healed tattoo will fade when exposed to the sun or tanning beds with time, if you must expose your HEALED tattoo to those nasty UV rays be sure to use a high SPF SUNBLOCK (at least 30)

EXPOSURE TO TOXINS / BACTERIA – If you work/live in an environment with dirt and filth you run the risk of infection, nursing homes/hospitals, being around animals, toxic metals/chemicals, and filth of all kind can cause a SERIOUS infections, be smart and use common sense …. If you have a tattoo on your hand/forarm and you work on a farm or change a diaper you run the risk of an infection …. The possibilities are endless …….

DAMAGED SKIN – If your skin is week, sun damaged, thin, or an artist overworks the tattoo it will cause the tattoo to heal badly

ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO LATEX OR TATTOO PIGMENT – If you are allergic to latex you will more than likely know before you get your tattoo. Let the artist know, NITREL or VINYL gloves can be used… signs of allergic reactions are extreme rash/redness in the case of latex (gloves worn by the artist)

An allergic reaction to tattoo ink is VERY RARE but is possible, if you are allergic to a pigment it will be evident certain colors in your tattoo bubbling and raising off of your skin resembling a SEVERE scar. If you are concerned about having a reaction to tattoo ink ask your artist about doing a “prick test” where a small dot of each color to be used in your potential artwork is tattooed under your skin at least 24 hours before your tattoo …. If you have a lot of allergies sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry….

I hope this has helped, together we can make your tattoo/healing experience a good one and give you a beautiful piece of living artwork that will last a lifetime…

We will do our part by applying your tattoo to the best of our ability with artistic skill in a clean environment, now please do your part and TAKE CARE OF IT, If you have any questions never hesitate to ask that’s what we’re here for…WE CARE

http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=5502297&blogID=262323041


Comments are closed.

Ed Hardy’s Tattoo Art Is Booty for Digital Pirates

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Don Ed Hardy, the famed tattoo artist, and his backers battle constantly with counterfeiters who create fake Web sites to peddle knock-offs of his gear.

Read more from the original source: Ed Hardy’s Tattoo Art Is Booty for Digital Pirates


Comments are closed.

Have a Tattoo or Walk With a Limp? The Police May Know

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

The New York Police Department’s Real Time Crime Center can jump-start investigations with identifying data like tattoos, teeth and birthmarks.

Excerpt from: Have a Tattoo or Walk With a Limp? The Police May Know


Comments are closed.

Drawn to a Larger Scale

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

For the tattoo artist Scott Campbell, a life of adventure, marked with ink, now includes a gallery show.

See more here: Drawn to a Larger Scale


Comments are closed.

The Body as Billboard: Your Ad Here

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Some marketers are getting their messages across by putting tattoos, both permanent and temporary, on willing wearers.

Read this article: The Body as Billboard: Your Ad Here


Comments are closed.

Seafarers’ Memoirs, Written on Skin

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

An exhibition at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia explores the role of sailors within tattoo culture.

Read this article: Seafarers’ Memoirs, Written on Skin


Comments are closed.

Self-Expression in Spray Paint and Ink

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

A graffiti writer and tattoo artist talks about how he got his start, and his subway-platform encounter with the legendary Iz the Wiz.

Read the original post: Self-Expression in Spray Paint and Ink


Comments are closed.

NATIONAL BRIEFING | THE MILITARY; Large Tattoos Will Bar Marines From Some Duties

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Marine Corps is no longer allowing marines who have extra-large tattoos on their arms to serve as recruiters or security guards at US embassies; photo

Go here to see the original: NATIONAL BRIEFING | THE MILITARY; Large Tattoos Will Bar Marines From Some Duties


Comments are closed.

Tattoos Gain Even More Visibility

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Permanent ink markings have begun creeping toward the traditional no-go zones for all kinds of people.

Read this article: Tattoos Gain Even More Visibility


Comments are closed.

One Way or Another, Arizona’s Darnell Dockett Will Get His Ink

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Darnell Dockett craves a new tattoo to commemorate a victory in Super Bowl XLIII at Raymond James Stadium.

Read the original: One Way or Another, Arizona’s Darnell Dockett Will Get His Ink


Comments are closed.

With This Tattoo, I Thee Wed

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Getting your ring-finger tattooed can put you select company. Still want one?

View post: With This Tattoo, I Thee Wed


Comments are closed.

With This Tattoo, I Thee Wed

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Getting your ring-finger tattooed can put you select company. Still want one?

View post: With This Tattoo, I Thee Wed


Comments are closed.

One Way or Another, Arizona’s Darnell Dockett Will Get His Ink

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Darnell Dockett craves a new tattoo to commemorate a victory in Super Bowl XLIII at Raymond James Stadium.

Read the original: One Way or Another, Arizona’s Darnell Dockett Will Get His Ink


Comments are closed.

Tattoos Gain Even More Visibility

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Permanent ink markings have begun creeping toward the traditional no-go zones for all kinds of people.

Read this article: Tattoos Gain Even More Visibility


Comments are closed.

NATIONAL BRIEFING | THE MILITARY; Large Tattoos Will Bar Marines From Some Duties

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Marine Corps is no longer allowing marines who have extra-large tattoos on their arms to serve as recruiters or security guards at US embassies; photo

Go here to see the original: NATIONAL BRIEFING | THE MILITARY; Large Tattoos Will Bar Marines From Some Duties


Comments are closed.

Self-Expression in Spray Paint and Ink

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

A graffiti writer and tattoo artist talks about how he got his start, and his subway-platform encounter with the legendary Iz the Wiz.

Read the original post: Self-Expression in Spray Paint and Ink


Comments are closed.

Seafarers’ Memoirs, Written on Skin

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

An exhibition at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia explores the role of sailors within tattoo culture.

Read this article: Seafarers’ Memoirs, Written on Skin


Comments are closed.

The Body as Billboard: Your Ad Here

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Some marketers are getting their messages across by putting tattoos, both permanent and temporary, on willing wearers.

Read this article: The Body as Billboard: Your Ad Here


Comments are closed.

Drawn to a Larger Scale

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

For the tattoo artist Scott Campbell, a life of adventure, marked with ink, now includes a gallery show.

See more here: Drawn to a Larger Scale


Comments are closed.

Have a Tattoo or Walk With a Limp? The Police May Know

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

The New York Police Department’s Real Time Crime Center can jump-start investigations with identifying data like tattoos, teeth and birthmarks.

Excerpt from: Have a Tattoo or Walk With a Limp? The Police May Know


Comments are closed.

Ed Hardy’s Tattoo Art Is Booty for Digital Pirates

by on Jun.03, 2010, under

Don Ed Hardy, the famed tattoo artist, and his backers battle constantly with counterfeiters who create fake Web sites to peddle knock-offs of his gear.

Read more from the original source: Ed Hardy’s Tattoo Art Is Booty for Digital Pirates


Comments are closed.

Metropolitan Diary

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

Autumn romance, a tribute in ink, a letter lost and found, and other tales of city life.

Read more from the original source: Metropolitan Diary


Comments are closed.

For an Accuser of the Police, a Family of Sorts

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

The Brooklyn tattoo parlor where Michael Mineo works is a tight-knit community.

Read the original here: For an Accuser of the Police, a Family of Sorts


Comments are closed.

Single-Speed Race for Multitude of Pedaling Eccentrics

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

At the Single Speed World Championship, the top rider wore a revealing “Borat”-style swimsuit he wore during the entire grueling and technical ride.

Read this article: Single-Speed Race for Multitude of Pedaling Eccentrics


Comments are closed.

Galaxy of Tar Talks Tattoos

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

Brookyln’s Galaxy of Tar – who have created a powerful amalgam of 70s-era Santana psychedelia with the prog-rock/metal components of contemporary acts Tool and Mars Volta – recently released a pair of tracks for free download at Lapdance Academy.


Comments are closed.

Artist Profile: Caesar Tattoo

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

caesar tattoo.jpg

While at the NYC Tattoo Convention a couple of weekends ago, I was introduced to a phenomenal black & grey artist whose realism and ornamental work is stellar, not just in its complex composition but also in the absolute harmony with the shape of the client’s body.

Check out the online portfolio of Caesar Tattoo in NYC.

Caesar, a Hungarian native, did his first tattoo in 1994 on a drunk in a smoky pub on the rural side of Budapest. Without someone to teach him the craft, Caesar “screwed up every volunteer’s skin around,” learning by trial and error, experimenting and carefully observing what worked and what didn’t. Since that rocky start, Caesar has refined his technique and style, making him an exciting artist to watch. Yes, he’s gotten international magazine coverage, but I’m surprised I haven’t seen more considering his extensive body of large scale, powerful work.

I thought it would be interesting to feature Caesar today, in particular, based on the work above — a half sleeve melding the Dominican and US flags, showing ethnic pride and American patriotism. [It’s not an either/or thing, Governor Brewer.]

caesar tattoo2.jpg
Here’s what Caesar said of the tattoo:

“Anthony is a broker from Long Island. He was born in the Dominican Republic–that’s why there’s the Dominican seal on the bicep and the gray-scaled Dominican flag–and he was raised in the US, which the American flag represents. I added the two little baby angels who hold the banner on the top of the seal. The cover up part is the window of the St. Rose Cathedral. His daughter’s name is Rose. There’s also a little rose bud growing out from the stone crack, fighting. We kept the original rose tattoos he had and just reworked them. I also added little daisies to break up the common sticker-style rose feeling.”

Caesar’s next convention date will be July 30-August 1st at the Visionary Tattoo Arts Festival in Ashbury Park, NJ. Otherwise, catch him at his East Village atelier.


Leave a Reply

Memorial Day Tribute

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

tim hoyer tattoo.jpg

We’ve had our BBQs and enjoyed the sunshine of this weekend, but it wouldn’t be Memorial Day in the US without giving pause to think on those who have lost their lives in serving our country.

Memorial and patriotic artwork is often tattooed to ensure that the fallen are remembered every day — work like this chestpiece by Timothy Hoyer of NY Adorned, and the neck rocker below by Jerrett of Monarch Tattoo in Washington.

flag tattoo by monarch tattoo.jpg
For more military & memorial tattoos check the Shock.Military.com galleries and MilitaryTattoos.us.

The rest is here: Memorial Day Tribute


Leave a Reply

Joe Capobianco’s The Bride

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

joe capobianco the bride.jpg

Following today’s theme of I want, I want, I want

Behold: Joe Capobianco‘s limited edition sexy art toy called “The Bride.”

Working with toy creators Kid Robot, Joe modeled this “Capo Girl” on a tattoo he created for The Baroness, shown below. The figure is 8 inches tall of soft vinyl. As Joe posted on his blog, there’s also a very limited number of glow-in-the-dark versions, which look killer cool.

“The Bride” goes on sale tomorrow at 11am EST on the Hope Gallery Online Store.


Leave a Reply

Memorial Day Tribute

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

tim hoyer tattoo.jpg

We’ve had our BBQs and enjoyed the sunshine of this weekend, but it wouldn’t be Memorial Day in the US without giving pause to think on those who have lost their lives in serving our country.

Memorial and patriotic artwork is often tattooed to ensure that the fallen are remembered every day — work like this chestpiece by Timothy Hoyer of NY Adorned, and the neck rocker below by Jerrett of Monarch Tattoo in Washington.

flag tattoo by monarch tattoo.jpg
For more military & memorial tattoos check the Shock.Military.com galleries and MilitaryTattoos.us.

The rest is here: Memorial Day Tribute


Leave a Reply

Artist Profile: Caesar Tattoo

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

caesar tattoo.jpg

While at the NYC Tattoo Convention a couple of weekends ago, I was introduced to a phenomenal black & grey artist whose realism and ornamental work is stellar, not just in its complex composition but also in the absolute harmony with the shape of the client’s body.

Check out the online portfolio of Caesar Tattoo in NYC.

Caesar, a Hungarian native, did his first tattoo in 1994 on a drunk in a smoky pub on the rural side of Budapest. Without someone to teach him the craft, Caesar “screwed up every volunteer’s skin around,” learning by trial and error, experimenting and carefully observing what worked and what didn’t. Since that rocky start, Caesar has refined his technique and style, making him an exciting artist to watch. Yes, he’s gotten international magazine coverage, but I’m surprised I haven’t seen more considering his extensive body of large scale, powerful work.

I thought it would be interesting to feature Caesar today, in particular, based on the work above — a half sleeve melding the Dominican and US flags, showing ethnic pride and American patriotism. [It’s not an either/or thing, Governor Brewer.]

caesar tattoo2.jpg
Here’s what Caesar said of the tattoo:

“Anthony is a broker from Long Island. He was born in the Dominican Republic–that’s why there’s the Dominican seal on the bicep and the gray-scaled Dominican flag–and he was raised in the US, which the American flag represents. I added the two little baby angels who hold the banner on the top of the seal. The cover up part is the window of the St. Rose Cathedral. His daughter’s name is Rose. There’s also a little rose bud growing out from the stone crack, fighting. We kept the original rose tattoos he had and just reworked them. I also added little daisies to break up the common sticker-style rose feeling.”

Caesar’s next convention date will be July 30-August 1st at the Visionary Tattoo Arts Festival in Ashbury Park, NJ. Otherwise, catch him at his East Village atelier.


Leave a Reply

Galaxy of Tar Talks Tattoos

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

Brookyln’s Galaxy of Tar – who have created a powerful amalgam of 70s-era Santana psychedelia with the prog-rock/metal components of contemporary acts Tool and Mars Volta – recently released a pair of tracks for free download at Lapdance Academy.


Leave a Reply

Single-Speed Race for Multitude of Pedaling Eccentrics

by on Jun.02, 2010, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

At the Single Speed World Championship, the top rider wore a revealing “Borat”-style swimsuit he wore during the entire grueling and technical ride.

Read this article: Single-Speed Race for Multitude of Pedaling Eccentrics

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Single-Speed Race for Multitude of Pedaling Eccentrics

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

At the Single Speed World Championship, the top rider wore a revealing “Borat”-style swimsuit he wore during the entire grueling and technical ride.

Read this article: Single-Speed Race for Multitude of Pedaling Eccentrics


Leave a Reply

For an Accuser of the Police, a Family of Sorts

by on Jun.02, 2010, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

The Brooklyn tattoo parlor where Michael Mineo works is a tight-knit community.

Read the original here: For an Accuser of the Police, a Family of Sorts

:, , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

For an Accuser of the Police, a Family of Sorts

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

The Brooklyn tattoo parlor where Michael Mineo works is a tight-knit community.

Read the original here: For an Accuser of the Police, a Family of Sorts


Leave a Reply

Metropolitan Diary

by on Jun.02, 2010, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Autumn romance, a tribute in ink, a letter lost and found, and other tales of city life.

Read more from the original source: Metropolitan Diary

:, , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Metropolitan Diary

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

Autumn romance, a tribute in ink, a letter lost and found, and other tales of city life.

Read more from the original source: Metropolitan Diary


Leave a Reply

'Tattoo' May Help Diabetics « Slice of MIT by the Alumni Association

by on Jun.02, 2010, under

Strano is working with Paul Barone, a postdoctoral researcher, on the sensing system that consists of a “tattoo” of nanoparticles designed to detect glucose, injected below the skin. A device similar to a wristwatch would be worn over …

Read more: ‘Tattoo’ May Help Diabetics « Slice of MIT by the Alumni Association


Leave a Reply

Galaxy of Tar Talks Tattoos

by on Jun.01, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

Brookyln’s Galaxy of Tar – who have created a powerful amalgam of 70s-era Santana psychedelia with the prog-rock/metal components of contemporary acts Tool and Mars Volta – recently released a pair of tracks for free download at Lapdance Academy.

:, , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Masterworks of Body Art Exhibition Photos

by on Jun.01, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

benavides tattoo.jpgA couple of weeks ago, I listed the Masterworks of Body Art exhibit at the Oceanside Museum of Art in
North San Diego in a must-see events post. James Tran, shop manager and apprentice under Bill Canales of Full Circle Tattoo, was there with Bill and clients of the studio, and sent along photos and a quick review of the show.

Check the photos, including the tattoo above by Rob Benavides of Flying Panther Tattoo, on our Flickr set.

Here’s what James had to say about the exhibit:

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

World Record: Most Tattooed Woman

by on Jun.01, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

most tattooed woman.jpg

I was gonna save this for the monster news review I’ll have up Friday but y’all keep sending me links to the articles, so hell, I might as well put it up now:

Meet the Guinness World Record-holder for the Most Tattooed Woman: Julia Gnuse.

The press has been loving her the past few days because she was in NYC for Book Expo America promoting the Guinness World Records 2011 annual and Gamer’s editions — and she was clearly a colorful attraction. But she also has a particularly interesting story.

As Julia says in this video interview with the BBC, she found tattooing as a way to cope with a skin disorder called Porphyria, which can cause blisters or scarring. Twenty years later, and with 95% of her body covered in various motifs including cartoons and celebrity portraits, the 55-year-old has won her place among Lucky Diamond Rich (Most Tattooed Person) and Isobel Varley (Most Senior Tattooed Woman) in Guinness’s Body Beautiful category.

Julia’s tattoos are mostly done by Art Godoy of Fun House Tattooing, and have cost her about $70,000, according to AOL News.

To see more of her art, check the photo set on Mirror News and in this Reuters video below.

See the rest here: World Record: Most Tattooed Woman

:, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Artist Profile: Caesar Tattoo

by on May.31, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

caesar tattoo.jpg

While at the NYC Tattoo Convention a couple of weekends ago, I was introduced to a phenomenal black & grey artist whose realism and ornamental work is stellar, not just in its complex composition but also in the absolute harmony with the shape of the client’s body.

Check out the online portfolio of Caesar Tattoo in NYC.

Caesar, a Hungarian native, did his first tattoo in 1994 on a drunk in a smoky pub on the rural side of Budapest. Without someone to teach him the craft, Caesar “screwed up every volunteer’s skin around,” learning by trial and error, experimenting and carefully observing what worked and what didn’t. Since that rocky start, Caesar has refined his technique and style, making him an exciting artist to watch. Yes, he’s gotten international magazine coverage, but I’m surprised I haven’t seen more considering his extensive body of large scale, powerful work.

I thought it would be interesting to feature Caesar today, in particular, based on the work above — a half sleeve melding the Dominican and US flags, showing ethnic pride and American patriotism. [It’s not an either/or thing, Governor Brewer.]

caesar tattoo2.jpg
Here’s what Caesar said of the tattoo:

“Anthony is a broker from Long Island. He was born in the Dominican Republic–that’s why there’s the Dominican seal on the bicep and the gray-scaled Dominican flag–and he was raised in the US, which the American flag represents. I added the two little baby angels who hold the banner on the top of the seal. The cover up part is the window of the St. Rose Cathedral. His daughter’s name is Rose. There’s also a little rose bud growing out from the stone crack, fighting. We kept the original rose tattoos he had and just reworked them. I also added little daisies to break up the common sticker-style rose feeling.”

Caesar’s next convention date will be July 30-August 1st at the Visionary Tattoo Arts Festival in Ashbury Park, NJ. Otherwise, catch him at his East Village atelier.

:, , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Memorial Day Tribute

by on May.31, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

tim hoyer tattoo.jpg

We’ve had our BBQs and enjoyed the sunshine of this weekend, but it wouldn’t be Memorial Day in the US without giving pause to think on those who have lost their lives in serving our country.

Memorial and patriotic artwork is often tattooed to ensure that the fallen are remembered every day — work like this chestpiece by Timothy Hoyer of NY Adorned, and the neck rocker below by Jerrett of Monarch Tattoo in Washington.

flag tattoo by monarch tattoo.jpg
For more military & memorial tattoos check the Shock.Military.com galleries and MilitaryTattoos.us.

The rest is here: Memorial Day Tribute

:, , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Holly Rose Review Final Issue

by on May.28, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

hhr worry.jpg

Our beloved tattoo and poetry journal, Holly Rose Review, has published its last issue but it leaves on its strongest note ever. As always, the poetry is finely curated by Editor and Publisher Theresa Senato Edwards, and the words are illustrated by the tattoo work of Luba Goldina, Maxime Lanouette, and Sean Herman.

The theme of this issue is Worry, as Theresa explains:

The poems share worries of all sorts: impending storms, the world ending, death, failure, germs, and aging. There is also an underlying motif of what transpires in dreams or when one lacks the capability to have them. There are questions of love, of living dishonestly, of
inequality, even a subtle query of the laws of physics.

The art
stuns us with facial expressions; well, let’s face it (pun intended),
the face is the first place where worry seems to land. And there is a vibrancy in the art, capturing
the landscape of worlds filled with a tugging, terror, both real and surreal.

We’re sad to see such a wonderful publication come to an end, but grateful for a project that brought our favorite art forms together so fluidly.

Continue reading here: Holly Rose Review Final Issue

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

First Amendment & Tattoos

by on May.25, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

yer cheatin heart.jpgPhoto of Johnny Anderson by Allen J. Schaben for Los
Angeles Times

In 2006, Johnny Anderson of Yer Cheat’n Heart Tattoo wanted to move his shop to a better location and decided on Hermosa Beach, CA; however, he was denied because zoning laws prohibited tattooing in the city (not as an outright ban but by not recognizing it as a permissible use). Johnny fought back, suing in federal court in LA claiming that his First Amendment rights were violated and that tattooing is protected artistic expression.

He lost that case because the court found that tattooing was a service and “‘not sufficiently imbued with elements
of communication” to be protected as speech.

But Johnny didn’t give up. He appealed to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which recently heard the case, and as the Los
Angeles Times
reports
, “some constitutional law scholars predict the outcome could be different
in what would be the first–and potentially precedent-setting–federal
appellate decision on whether the tattoo artist is engaged in 1st
Amendment-protected activity when designing and applying custom tattoos.”

This means that if Johnny wins, similar oppressive zoning laws–which are some of the biggest obstacles tattooists must overcome in opening up shop across the US–could be challenged with greater success; even better, local officials may think twice before drafting/amending laws to keep tattoo shops out of their districts.

Other tattooists have challenged tattoo bans on other grounds and have won, but in my opinion, this constitutional question is the most interesting and far reaching in its implications:


Does the First Amendment right to free expression protect tattooing?

Here’s what one scholar said to the LA Times:

“If it’s art, it’s art, and art gets protection,” UC Berkeley law professor and 1st Amendment expert Jesse Choper said of the debate over whether tattoos are protected speech. Hermosa Beach might have a chance of prevailing with the 9th Circuit judges, he said, if it imposed
regulations limiting the practice to certain parts of the city or required the involvement of medical professionals. But he said he doubts its total ban on tattoo parlors will pass constitutional review.

The state-wide Massachusetts ban on tattooing was deemed unconstitutional by Judge Barbara Rouse in 2000, who ruled on a civil case brought by a tattooist and the ACLU challenging the ban. In her opinion, Judge Rouse said that tattooing is an ancient art form practiced in almost every culture. She added:

“Persons obtain tattoos to demonstrate commitment to other persons, to institutions, to religious beliefs, and to political and personal beliefs. The medium on which the drawn image appears should not be relevant when determining whether something is ‘speech’; the tattoo itself is symbolic speech deserving of First Amendment protection.”

[...]

“The current ban on tattooing has promoted an underground tattoo
industry with no controls which, in turn, has increased health risks.”

Read more on the Massachusetts tattoo battle in this
New Yorker article
.

That was a state court case, however, and limited in its impact on other bans outside Mass. When a case challenging South Carolina’s tattoo ban, White v. South Carolina, was appealed to the US Supreme Court, the highest court in the country refused to hear it (even with Ken Starr arguing it). The tattoo ban was eventually overturned in 2004. [More on that case here and see the S.C. appellate case here.]

FYI: The last state ban to be overturned was Oklahoma in 2006.

Now, with the 9th Circuit Federal Court of Appeals looking into tattoo protections under the constitution, these local bans might also brought down, and just as important, another court will find tattooing as an art form.

Will keep on eye on it and let you know how it goes.

UPDATE: More legal analysis on HuffPo

Original post: First Amendment & Tattoos

:, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Joe Capobianco’s The Bride

by on May.19, 2010, under Needles and Sins Blog

joe capobianco the bride.jpg

Following today’s theme of I want, I want, I want

Behold: Joe Capobianco‘s limited edition sexy art toy called “The Bride.”

Working with toy creators Kid Robot, Joe modeled this “Capo Girl” on a tattoo he created for The Baroness, shown below. The figure is 8 inches tall of soft vinyl. As Joe posted on his blog, there’s also a very limited number of glow-in-the-dark versions, which look killer cool.

“The Bride” goes on sale tomorrow at 11am EST on the Hope Gallery Online Store.

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

AFTERCARE

by on May.12, 2010, under

This is an example of a WordPress page, you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.


Leave a Reply

About

by on May.12, 2010, under

This is an example of a WordPress page, you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.


Comments are closed.

by on May.02, 2010, under tattoo aftercare, TattooAftercare.org

12  Nov

Brandon Bond is one of the most interviewed tattoo artists on the planet. Tattoo artist interviews are usually based on a “paint by numbers” list of uninteresting questions. “What are your influences?” “How long have you been tattooing?” and other retarted inquiries flodded his first 60 articles or so.
In an attempt to avoid this, Brandon posted a request for questions that YOU GUYS wanted to know about on the messageboard form on www.allornothingtattoo.com This is a collection of those quetions and his answers and will be used in the next round of interviews and featured articles worldwide.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Industry News. Date: November 12, 2007, 11:55 am | Comments Off

08  Nov

Tattoo Inks:

The composition of tattoo pigment colors is as follows:

Black – Carbon (India Ink), iron oxide, logwood
Blue – Cobalt aluminate
Brown – Ferric oxide
Green – Chromic oxide, lead chromate, phthalocyanine dyes
Purple – Manganese, aluminum
Red – Mercuric sulfide (cinnabar), sienna (ferric hydrate), sandalwood, brazilwood, organic pigments (aromatic azo compounds)
White – Titanium oxide, zinc oxide
Yellow – Cadmium sulfide

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide (cinnabar). Alternative red dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing Mercury; however, red reactions still continue to be reported. Various allergic reactions can occur, red is usually the color responsible however; yellow, green and blue are the next most common.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Inks. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:43 am | Comments Off

Now, you have your fresh new tattoo, and you want to take good care of it!

Leave That Bandage Alone!

Your artist took the care to cover up your new tattoo for a very good reason – to keep airborn bacteria from invading your wound. Leave the bandage on for a minimum of two hours. Excitement of having a new tattoo will make you want to remove the bandage, but you will just have to wait until later.

Wash and Treat
After you remove the bandage, you will want to wash your tattoo. Use lukewarm water and mild, liquid antibacterial or antimicrobial soap that is fragrance free. Follow with a very light application of your choice of Tattoo treatment. *see below

Specialty Products and Lotions
If you prefer, you can use a specialty product such as H2Ocean. It’s not necessary, as many over the counter products work just fine, but it’s your choice. But remember, H2Ocean was created for the purpose of using their products on a Tattoo. Use the product as directed and continue for 3-5 days.

After that, continue to keep it clean.

A few side notes:

1. While your tattoo is healing try not to soak it while showering, also try to avoid swimming for a few days.

2. PROTECT YOUR TATTOO FROM THE SUN!

3. Do not use petroleum based products

4. Do not use anti-bacterial soaps (except right after getting your tattoo after you unwrap).

5. Do not use moisture creams with fragrance added

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:41 am | Comments Off


Comments are closed.

by on May.02, 2010, under

By Ryan Almighty / ALMIGHTY STUDIOS

320 Cherry st, Jamestown NY

(716) 487-1243

www.almightytattoo.com

http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=5502297&blogID=262323041

There is NO foolproof set of aftercare instructions for a healing tattoo. Everybody is different and there is always a risk of an allergic reaction or problems. I will do my best to explain a couple of options and will give a few examples of products and hopefully help troubleshoot any problems you may have..

Here is a list of some aftercare products and their potential risks….

TATTOO AFTERCARE PRODUCTS (TATTOO GOO, INK FIXX, TAT WAX, BLACK CAT, H2OCEAN FOAM, ETC)

I tend to recommend products that have been created by people in the industry specifically for the use of healing a tattoo, but there are a few risks for you to consider and look for. The trend in the tattoo industry is to preach the wonders of the new “miracle product” my advice is to not be a fool to marketing gimmicks, the manufacturer is sure to have a list of reasons as to why their product is superior, the truth of the matter is they have money to make and are more interested in sales than anything else, including the healing of your tattoo, these people are modern day snake oil salesmen, so I’m of the opinion to take the grandiose claims with a grain of salt.. The fact of the matter is ALL of these products have healed some tattoos perfectly and ALL have caused reactions (sometimes severe) in others. All have different ingredience and it is in your best interest to read them and look for anything that you know to be a problem. For example some products contain BEES WAX , common sense will tell you that if you are allergic to bees, it might be a bad idea to use the product….

My personal favorite product is the H2OCEAN FOAM I have seen many fewer (if any) reactions to this than the other aftercare, the foam tends to absorb into the skin, and creates less discharge which in turn seems to produce less scabbing thus smoother healing, the only complaint that I have heard is that it slightly burns a few peoples skin when first applied. I heal all of my tattoos with this product and swear by it, but just because it seems to be the best for me doesn’t mean that you will like it..

OVER THE COUNTER OINTMENTS/CREMES (NEOSPORIN , TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC, BACITRATION AQUAPHOR, PREPERATION H, NOXEMA, A&D, VITAMIN E OIL, ETC)

I prefer products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare which these are NOT but I will be the first to admit that many tattoos have been successfully healed with all of these over the counter ointments. However the most popular error that people make with these (and all the other aftercare for that matter) is that they over do it ant put far too much of it on their healing tattoo, it is imperative that you put as thin of a layer on your healing tattoo as possible, it is my opinion that ANY product that is PERTOLIUM or LANOLIN based is inferior for healing of tattoos and produce a far greater risk of reaction, excessive seeping and scabbing, thus resulting in color loss. TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC and NEOSPORIN seem to have the highest risk of reaction and if you use them please do so with caution, NEOSPORIN for example used to be considered to be the absolute best in aftercare by the majority of people in the industry. Some (reputable I might add) artists still swear by it today, but it is a popular opinion that there is a higher rate of reaction (rashes/pimples) and a greater risk of color loss, to be honest I personally am not sure if the critics of NEOSPORIN have their facts straight or have bastardized the product because it is considered “old school”. I am not one of those people that will claim that it is the absolute worst thing you could put on a tattoo, but I’m not an advocate of it either… My opinion of the best OVER THE COUNTER aftercare products are AQUAPHOR, A&D, and BACITRATION (in that order)…. But I honestly wouldn’t use them unless I had to..

OVER THE COUNTER SKIN LOTION (LUBRIDERM,CUREL,VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE, ETC)

First off if you use any SKIN LOTION for tattoo aftercare it is IMPARITIVE that you only use the name brands recommended and be absolutely sure that they are NON SCENTED and contain NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS!!!! a scented lotion and/or one with artificial color will burn and more than likely cause a reaction. There are reputable artists that recommend nothing but skin lotion for a healing tattoo. And some that recommend the use of LOTION after 3-4 days. Like everything else here many tattoos have been successfully healed with these, HOWEVER I have personally witnessed the WORST/MORE FREQUENT REACTIONS with Lotions than virtually any other form of aftercare. I have seen large puss filled pimples from these products on some people to an extreme that overshadows anything I have ever witnessed with any ointment or any other kind of aftercare’s bad reaction. I think people tend to completely over do it with this kind of product. And I think there is a lot of room for error when choosing a lotion, such as accidentally getting a scented/colored or an off name inferior product containing elements detrimental to the healing of a tattoo. I have also seen people mistakenly use VASELINE PETROLIUM JELLY (which is horrible for a healing tattoo) because they thought it was the same as VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE. So I recommend that if you are someone that chooses to use lotion for aftercare be very aware of what you are putting on your tattoo and make sure that it is EXACTLY what your artist recommended and even then keep on the watch for reactions.

SIGNES OF A GOOD/NORMAL HEALING TATTOO …… the tattoo will go through a period where they peel, the skin that peels will be the color of the tattoo, and it will literally look like your tattoo is flaking off the more even the tattoo peels the better the tattoo will look when it is completely healed, underneath the peeled skin you will have healing skin cells that will cause the skin to seem milky rather than transparent, don’t worry about this, you tattoo will be bright in no time, it’s all part of the healing process.

SYMPTOMS OF BAD REACTIONS / BAD HEALING CAUSED BY AFTERCARE ….

Aftercare reaction is one of the leading causes of a badly healed tattoo.. Some things to look for are extreme seeping/heavy scabbing, excessive inflammation, and most of all a rash (little bumps) or excessive pimples. If you think that you are having a reaction to your aftercare it is VERY IMPORTANT that you consult your artist asap, you can save your tattoo if you deal with the situation right away…

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS OF A BAD HEALING TATTOO ……. If you are having a problem with your healing tattoo done at a reputable shop, it more times than not IS your choice of aftercare, a few other things that will cause a tattoo to heal badly are…

NEGLECT – If you don’t practice good personal hygiene, pick your tattoo, let clothing stick to it, scrub your healing tattoo in the shower your tattoo will NOT look nice when it heals, do the right thing and take care of your investment you’re going to have it the rest of your life…

YOUR HEALTH – If you have immunity deficiencies, blood disorders such as diabetes, or are on certain medications such as steroids or blood thinners your tattoo tattoo could be affected, it is a good idea to consult your doctor if you suspect there may be a problem.

SUN EXPOSURE – The sun is your tattoos worst enemy, if you expose your healing tattoo to the sun it can react with the healing ink and literally burn it from the inside out, so UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES expose your healing tattoo to prolonged direct sunlight. Even a healed tattoo will fade when exposed to the sun or tanning beds with time, if you must expose your HEALED tattoo to those nasty UV rays be sure to use a high SPF SUNBLOCK (at least 30)

EXPOSURE TO TOXINS / BACTERIA – If you work/live in an environment with dirt and filth you run the risk of infection, nursing homes/hospitals, being around animals, toxic metals/chemicals, and filth of all kind can cause a SERIOUS infections, be smart and use common sense …. If you have a tattoo on your hand/forarm and you work on a farm or change a diaper you run the risk of an infection …. The possibilities are endless …….

DAMAGED SKIN – If your skin is week, sun damaged, thin, or an artist overworks the tattoo it will cause the tattoo to heal badly

ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO LATEX OR TATTOO PIGMENT – If you are allergic to latex you will more than likely know before you get your tattoo. Let the artist know, NITREL or VINYL gloves can be used… signs of allergic reactions are extreme rash/redness in the case of latex (gloves worn by the artist)

An allergic reaction to tattoo ink is VERY RARE but is possible, if you are allergic to a pigment it will be evident certain colors in your tattoo bubbling and raising off of your skin resembling a SEVERE scar. If you are concerned about having a reaction to tattoo ink ask your artist about doing a “prick test” where a small dot of each color to be used in your potential artwork is tattooed under your skin at least 24 hours before your tattoo …. If you have a lot of allergies sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry….

I hope this has helped, together we can make your tattoo/healing experience a good one and give you a beautiful piece of living artwork that will last a lifetime…

We will do our part by applying your tattoo to the best of our ability with artistic skill in a clean environment, now please do your part and TAKE CARE OF IT, If you have any questions never hesitate to ask that’s what we’re here for…WE CARE

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: January 7, 2008, 8:27 am | Comments Off

Laser Removal

A laser is used to send pulses of highly concentrated light to break up the ink underneath the top layers of your skin. The laser goes right through the top layers because skin cells are made up of mostly water and melanin, but the larger ink particles absorb the laser’s energy and break into smaller pieces. Your immune system sends scavenger cells to carry off the ink particles, which are now small enough to be dealt with in this way.

Laser removal can be quite painful, and most patients are treated with a local anesthetic gel before the procedure. Blisters and scabs appear on the skin after treatment, and scarring is a possibility. Sessions are scheduled anywhere from three weeks to three months apart, depending on the clinic and how quickly your skin heals afterward. Most tattoos require from one to ten treatments; the average is one to four for home-done tattoos and five to ten for professional tattoos. Treatment session cost anywhere from $250 to $850, and a large and colorful tattoo may cost thousands of dollars to get rid of.

Intense Pulsed Light Therapy

Intense Light Pulse Therapy is the newest and most effective technology used for tattoo removal. IPL works in the same way as laser removal, except a special gel is rubbed on the skin and a wand is used to emit the light pulses. It is also less painful and requires fewer treatments. Unfortunately, it carries a much heftier price tag than laser removal, which is why IPL has not yet replaced traditional lasers. Prices vary, but one clinic charges ten dollars per pulse of light used.

Dermabrasion

Dermabrasion is exactly what it sounds like. The tattooed area is sprayed with a numbing solution, and a grinding tool is used to create abrasive friction that takes off the top layers of skin. Not only does the procedure cause the skin to peel and bleed, it is also very painful and often proves ineffective. Plus, there is always the risk of infection.

Salabrasion

Salabrasion is a centuries-old technique and is just like dermabrasion, except a salt-water solution is applied to the skin before it is abraded.

Excision

Excision is the surgical removal of a tattoo. A local anesthetic is injected, and the tattoo is cut out of the skin. The surrounding skin is then sewn back together. While this would obviously work best for small tattoos, large tattoos can also be excised. The middle part of the tattoo is removed first. After the skin heals, the surrounding areas are cut out until the tattoo is completely gone. Skin grafts are often needed for large tattoo removal. This procedure carries a risk of infection and a very high risk of scarring.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Regrets. Date: November 19, 2007, 9:49 am | Comments Off

Almost all artists will recommend using lotion after the first few days of healing to keep the skin moist.
This is where it can get a little tricky. All different brands of lotions contain different ingredients. Some that are OK, but some can be very damaging to a new tattoo. Watch the ingredients – lanolin is an ingredient some will use, and lanolin causes allergic reactions in a lot of people. Lanolin is the natural oil that comes from sheep’s wool. Some also contain products such as  bee’s wax or petroleum, which can clog pores and even contain contaminants. First and foremost, your tattoo needs to be clean, and it needs to breathe. If the pores are clogged, its going to cause infection. If you use lotion, find one that is free of dyes and fragrances. H2Ocean Tattoo Aftercare Lotion. Specially made tatttoo aftercare ointments have been highly recommended by the artists that use them. (Brandon Bond, Paul Booth, Rhonda Marsh and etc…)

The best thing to do is to listen to your artist. If you experience any problems with the aftercare they recommend, discontinue use immediately. If you already know you are susceptible to allergic reactions, let your artist know and ask them what they would recommend as an alternative. Don’t be stingy because the product they recommend is $3.00 more than something else – your tattoo is going to last you for the rest of your life, especially if you take good care of it. And paying $5.00-$10.00 for aftercare to ensure $500.00 worth of Ink work…… is worth it.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 14, 2007, 8:02 am | Comments Off

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

Link

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Regrets. Date: November 13, 2007, 7:50 am | Comments Off

12  Nov

Brandon Bond

Brandon Bond is one of the most interviewed tattoo artists on the planet. Tattoo artist interviews are usually based on a “paint by numbers” list of uninteresting questions. “What are your influences?” “How long have you been tattooing?” and other retarted inquiries flodded his first 60 articles or so.
In an attempt to avoid this, Brandon posted a request for questions that YOU GUYS wanted to know about on the messageboard form on www.allornothingtattoo.com This is a collection of those quetions and his answers and will be used in the next round of interviews and featured articles worldwide.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Industry News. Date: November 12, 2007, 11:55 am | Comments Off

08  Nov

Tattoo Inks:

The composition of tattoo pigment colors is as follows:

Black – Carbon (India Ink), iron oxide, logwood
Blue – Cobalt aluminate
Brown – Ferric oxide
Green – Chromic oxide, lead chromate, phthalocyanine dyes
Purple – Manganese, aluminum
Red – Mercuric sulfide (cinnabar), sienna (ferric hydrate), sandalwood, brazilwood, organic pigments (aromatic azo compounds)
White – Titanium oxide, zinc oxide
Yellow – Cadmium sulfide

Allergic reactions to red tattoo pigments are the most common and may be caused by a variety of pigments, especially mercury sulfide (cinnabar). Alternative red dyes have been developed because of the problems associated with red tattoo pigment containing Mercury; however, red reactions still continue to be reported. Various allergic reactions can occur, red is usually the color responsible however; yellow, green and blue are the next most common.

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Inks. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:43 am | Comments Off

Now, you have your fresh new tattoo, and you want to take good care of it!

Leave That Bandage Alone!

Your artist took the care to cover up your new tattoo for a very good reason – to keep airborn bacteria from invading your wound. Leave the bandage on for a minimum of two hours. Excitement of having a new tattoo will make you want to remove the bandage, but you will just have to wait until later.

Wash and Treat
After you remove the bandage, you will want to wash your tattoo. Use lukewarm water and mild, liquid antibacterial or antimicrobial soap that is fragrance free. Follow with a very light application of your choice of Tattoo treatment. *see below

Specialty Products and Lotions
If you prefer, you can use a specialty product such as H2Ocean. It’s not necessary, as many over the counter products work just fine, but it’s your choice. But remember, H2Ocean was created for the purpose of using their products on a Tattoo. Use the product as directed and continue for 3-5 days.

After that, continue to keep it clean.

A few side notes:

1. While your tattoo is healing try not to soak it while showering, also try to avoid swimming for a few days.

2. PROTECT YOUR TATTOO FROM THE SUN!

3. Do not use petroleum based products

4. Do not use anti-bacterial soaps (except right after getting your tattoo after you unwrap).

5. Do not use moisture creams with fragrance added

Posted by admin, filed under Tattoo Aftercare. Date: November 8, 2007, 9:41 am | Comments Off


Comments are closed.

Drawn to a Larger Scale

by on Apr.15, 2010, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

For the tattoo artist Scott Campbell, a life of adventure, marked with ink, now includes a gallery show.

See more here: Drawn to a Larger Scale

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Have a Tattoo or Walk With a Limp? The Police May Know

by on Feb.18, 2010, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

The New York Police Department’s Real Time Crime Center can jump-start investigations with identifying data like tattoos, teeth and birthmarks.

Excerpt from: Have a Tattoo or Walk With a Limp? The Police May Know

:, , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Ed Hardy’s Tattoo Art Is Booty for Digital Pirates

by on Nov.13, 2009, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Don Ed Hardy, the famed tattoo artist, and his backers battle constantly with counterfeiters who create fake Web sites to peddle knock-offs of his gear.

Read more from the original source: Ed Hardy’s Tattoo Art Is Booty for Digital Pirates

:, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Self-Expression in Spray Paint and Ink

by on Aug.11, 2009, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

A graffiti writer and tattoo artist talks about how he got his start, and his subway-platform encounter with the legendary Iz the Wiz.

Read the original post: Self-Expression in Spray Paint and Ink

:, , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Seafarers’ Memoirs, Written on Skin

by on May.23, 2009, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

An exhibition at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia explores the role of sailors within tattoo culture.

Read this article: Seafarers’ Memoirs, Written on Skin

:, , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

The Body as Billboard: Your Ad Here

by on Feb.18, 2009, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Some marketers are getting their messages across by putting tattoos, both permanent and temporary, on willing wearers.

Read this article: The Body as Billboard: Your Ad Here

:, , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

One Way or Another, Arizona’s Darnell Dockett Will Get His Ink

by on Feb.01, 2009, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Darnell Dockett craves a new tattoo to commemorate a victory in Super Bowl XLIII at Raymond James Stadium.

Read the original: One Way or Another, Arizona’s Darnell Dockett Will Get His Ink

:, , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Tattoos Gain Even More Visibility

by on Sep.25, 2008, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Permanent ink markings have begun creeping toward the traditional no-go zones for all kinds of people.

Read this article: Tattoos Gain Even More Visibility

:, , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

NATIONAL BRIEFING | THE MILITARY; Large Tattoos Will Bar Marines From Some Duties

by on Sep.16, 2008, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Marine Corps is no longer allowing marines who have extra-large tattoos on their arms to serve as recruiters or security guards at US embassies; photo

Go here to see the original: NATIONAL BRIEFING | THE MILITARY; Large Tattoos Will Bar Marines From Some Duties

:, , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.

With This Tattoo, I Thee Wed

by on Sep.14, 2008, under New York Times, Tattoo News, TattooAftercare.org

Getting your ring-finger tattooed can put you select company. Still want one?

View post: With This Tattoo, I Thee Wed

:, , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Tattoo Removal Options

by on Nov.19, 2007, under Tattoo Regrets

Laser Removal

A laser is used to send pulses of highly concentrated light to break up the ink underneath the top layers of your skin. The laser goes right through the top layers because skin cells are made up of mostly water and melanin, but the larger ink particles absorb the laser’s energy and break into smaller pieces. Your immune system sends scavenger cells to carry off the ink particles, which are now small enough to be dealt with in this way.

Laser removal can be quite painful, and most patients are treated with a local anesthetic gel before the procedure. Blisters and scabs appear on the skin after treatment, and scarring is a possibility. Sessions are scheduled anywhere from three weeks to three months apart, depending on the clinic and how quickly your skin heals afterward. Most tattoos require from one to ten treatments; the average is one to four for home-done tattoos and five to ten for professional tattoos. Treatment session cost anywhere from $250 to $850, and a large and colorful tattoo may cost thousands of dollars to get rid of.

Intense Pulsed Light Therapy

Intense Light Pulse Therapy is the newest and most effective technology used for tattoo removal. IPL works in the same way as laser removal, except a special gel is rubbed on the skin and a wand is used to emit the light pulses. It is also less painful and requires fewer treatments. Unfortunately, it carries a much heftier price tag than laser removal, which is why IPL has not yet replaced traditional lasers. Prices vary, but one clinic charges ten dollars per pulse of light used.

Dermabrasion

Dermabrasion is exactly what it sounds like. The tattooed area is sprayed with a numbing solution, and a grinding tool is used to create abrasive friction that takes off the top layers of skin. Not only does the procedure cause the skin to peel and bleed, it is also very painful and often proves ineffective. Plus, there is always the risk of infection.

Salabrasion

Salabrasion is a centuries-old technique and is just like dermabrasion, except a salt-water solution is applied to the skin before it is abraded.

Excision

Excision is the surgical removal of a tattoo. A local anesthetic is injected, and the tattoo is cut out of the skin. The surrounding skin is then sewn back together. While this would obviously work best for small tattoos, large tattoos can also be excised. The middle part of the tattoo is removed first. After the skin heals, the surrounding areas are cut out until the tattoo is completely gone. Skin grafts are often needed for large tattoo removal. This procedure carries a risk of infection and a very high risk of scarring.


Comments are closed.

Tattoo Aftercare Lotions

by on Oct.18, 2007, under tattoo aftercare, TattooAftercare.org

Almost all artists will recommend using lotion after the first few days of healing to keep the skin moist.
This is where it can get a little tricky. All different brands of lotions contain different ingredients. Some that are OK, but some can be very damaging to a new tattoo. Watch the ingredients – lanolin is an ingredient some will use, and lanolin causes allergic reactions in a lot of people. Lanolin is the natural oil that comes from sheep’s wool. Some also contain products such as  bee’s wax or petroleum, which can clog pores and even contain contaminants. First and foremost, your tattoo needs to be clean, and it needs to breathe. If the pores are clogged, its going to cause infection. If you use lotion, find one that is free of dyes and fragrances. H2Ocean Tattoo Aftercare Lotion is specially made tatttoo aftercare ointments have been highly recommended by the artists that use them. (Brandon Bond, Paul Booth, Rhonda Marsh and etc…)

The best thing to do is to listen to your artist. If you experience any problems with the aftercare they recommend, discontinue use immediately. If you already know you are susceptible to allergic reactions, let your artist know and ask them what they would recommend as an alternative. Don’t be stingy because the product they recommend is $3.00 more than something else – your tattoo is going to last you for the rest of your life, especially if you take good care of it. And paying $5.00-$10.00 for aftercare to ensure $500.00 worth of Ink work…… is worth it.


Comments are closed.

Tattoo designs you’ll regret

by on Oct.14, 2007, under Tattoo Regrets

Happy News has a great article on getting tattoos you might regret.

“In a national survey in which 163 tattooed men and women were asked about their tattoos one-third of those men and women said they regretted their tattoo.

The reasons for why someone regrets getting their tattoo vary as much as the reasons why they want to get them. People’s likes, dislikes and affiliations change as they grow older and what someone likes or thinks is cool at age 20 will not be the same at age 50. For this reason, tattoos should never be done on a whim or to please someone else. It is permanent and the tattoo wearer has to live with it. Tattoos should also never be done while the wearer is drunk or intoxicated in any way; in fact, it is illegal to do so.

Choosing a tattoo should be a very personal and meaningful experience. There are two basic types of tattoos: flash and custom. A flash tattoo is the designs you see in stock at the tattoo parlor while a custom tattoo is one a customer brings in themselves. Either way, the decision should not be taken lightly. An aspiring tattoo wearer should choose a design that represents them.”

TATTOO NO-NO’s

1. LOVER’S NAME

2. GANG SYMBOLS

3. PRISON TATS

4. LOCATION

5. CARTOONS, MUSICIANS, ACTORS

6. POOR QUALITY

7. WHIMS or DARES

It is very expensive to remove a tattoo. Expect to pay $1,000 to remove even a fairly small-sized tattoo if you’re looking at laser surgery. Also expect to have a noticeable ugly scar with a non-laser technique. Health insurance companies will not pay for tattoo removal because it is considered an aesthetic and elective surgery and not required for their physical health.

http://www.happynews.com/living/bodyart/tattoo-designs-youll.htm


Comments are closed.

THE TRUTH ABOUT TATTOO AFTERCARE

by on May.08, 2007, under tattoo aftercare, TattooAftercare.org

20 Cherry st, Jamestown NY
(716) 487-1243
www.almightytattoo.com

There is NO foolproof set of aftercare instructions for a healing tattoo. Everybody is different and there is always a risk of an allergic reaction or problems. I will do my best to explain a couple of options and will give a few examples of  products and hopefully help troubleshoot any problems you may have..

Here is a list of some aftercare products and their potential risks….

TATTOO AFTERCARE PRODUCTS (TATTOO GOO, INK FIXX, TAT WAX, BLACK CAT, H2OCEAN FOAM, ETC)

I tend to recommend products that have been created by people in the industry specifically for the use of healing a tattoo, but there are a few risks for you to consider and look for. The trend in the tattoo industry is to preach the wonders of the new “miracle product” my advice is to not be a fool to marketing gimmicks, the manufacturer is sure to have a list of reasons as to why their product is superior, the truth of the matter is they have money to make and are more interested in sales than anything else, including the healing of your tattoo, these people are modern day snake oil salesmen, so I’m of the opinion to take the grandiose claims with a grain of salt.. The fact of the matter is ALL of these products have healed some tattoos perfectly and ALL have caused reactions (sometimes severe) in others. All have different ingredience and it is in your best interest to read them and look for anything that you know to be a problem. For example some products contain BEES WAX , common sense will tell you that if you are allergic to bees, it might be a bad idea to use the product….

My personal favorite product is the H2OCEAN FOAM I have seen many fewer (if any) reactions to this than the other aftercare, the foam tends to absorb into the skin, and creates less discharge which in turn seems to produce less scabbing thus smoother healing, the only complaint that I have heard is that it slightly burns a few peoples skin when first applied. I heal all of my tattoos with this product and swear by it, but just because it seems to be the best for me doesn’t mean that you will like it..

OVER THE COUNTER OINTMENTS/CREMES (NEOSPORIN , TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC,  BACITRATION AQUAPHOR, PREPERATION H, NOXEMA, A&D, VITAMIN E OIL, ETC)

I prefer products designed specifically for tattoo aftercare which these are NOT but I will be the first to admit that many tattoos have been successfully healed with all of these over the counter ointments. However the most popular error that people make with these (and all the other aftercare for that matter) is that they over do it ant put far too much of it on their healing tattoo, it is imperative that you put as thin of a layer on your healing tattoo as possible, it is my opinion that ANY product that is PERTOLIUM or LANOLIN based is inferior for healing of tattoos and produce a far greater risk of reaction, excessive seeping and scabbing, thus resulting in color loss. TRIPLE ANTIBIOTIC and NEOSPORIN seem to have the highest risk of reaction and if you use them please do so with caution, NEOSPORIN for example used to be considered to be the absolute best in aftercare by the majority of people in the industry.  Some (reputable I might add) artists still swear by it today, but it is a popular opinion that there is a higher rate of reaction (rashes/pimples) and a greater risk of color loss, to be honest I personally am not sure if the critics of NEOSPORIN have their facts straight or have bastardized the product because it is considered “old school”. I am not one of those people that will claim that it is the absolute worst thing you could put on a tattoo, but I’m not an advocate of it either… My opinion of the best OVER THE COUNTER aftercare products are AQUAPHOR, A&D, and BACITRATION (in that order)…. But I honestly wouldn’t use them unless I had to..

OVER THE COUNTER SKIN LOTION (LUBRIDERM,CUREL,VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE,  ETC)

First off if you use any SKIN LOTION for tattoo aftercare it is IMPARITIVE that you only use the name brands recommended and be absolutely sure that they are NON SCENTED and contain NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS!!!! a scented lotion and/or one with artificial color will burn and more than likely cause a reaction. There are reputable artists that recommend nothing but skin lotion for a healing tattoo. And some that recommend the use of LOTION after 3-4 days. Like everything else here many tattoos have been successfully healed with these, HOWEVER I have personally witnessed  the WORST/MORE FREQUENT REACTIONS with Lotions than virtually any other form of aftercare. I have seen large puss filled pimples from these products on some people to an extreme that overshadows anything I have ever witnessed with any ointment or any other kind of aftercare’s bad reaction. I think people tend to completely over do it with this kind of product. And I think there is a lot of room for error when choosing a lotion, such as accidentally getting a scented/colored or an off name inferior product containing elements detrimental to the healing of a tattoo. I have also seen people mistakenly use VASELINE PETROLIUM JELLY (which is horrible for a healing tattoo) because they thought it was the same as VASELINE INTENSIVE CARE. So I recommend that if you are someone that chooses to use lotion for aftercare be very aware of what you are putting on your tattoo and make sure that it is EXACTLY what your artist recommended and even then keep on the watch for reactions.

SIGNES OF A GOOD/NORMAL HEALING TATTOO …… the tattoo will go through a period where they peel, the skin that peels will be the color of the tattoo, and it will literally look like your tattoo is flaking off the more even the tattoo peels the better the tattoo will look when it is completely healed, underneath the peeled skin you will have healing skin cells that will cause the skin to seem milky rather than transparent, don’t worry about this, you tattoo will be bright in no time, it’s all part of the healing process.

SYMPTOMS OF BAD REACTIONS / BAD HEALING CAUSED BY AFTERCARE ….

Aftercare reaction is one of the leading causes of a badly healed tattoo.. Some things to look for are extreme seeping/heavy scabbing,  excessive inflammation, and most of all a rash (little bumps) or excessive pimples. If you think that you are having a reaction to your aftercare it is VERY IMPORTANT that you consult your artist asap, you can save your tattoo if you deal with the situation right away…

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS OF A BAD HEALING TATTOO ……. If you are having a problem with your healing tattoo done at a reputable shop, it more times than not IS your choice of aftercare, a few other things that will cause a tattoo to heal badly are…

NEGLECT – If you don’t practice good personal hygiene, pick your tattoo, let clothing stick to it, scrub your healing tattoo in the shower your tattoo will NOT look nice when it heals, do the right thing and take care of your investment you’re going to have it the rest of your life…

YOUR HEALTH – If you have immunity deficiencies, blood disorders such as diabetes, or are on certain medications such as steroids or blood thinners your tattoo tattoo could be affected, it is a good idea to consult your doctor if you suspect there may be a problem.

SUN EXPOSURE – The sun is your tattoos worst enemy, if you expose your healing tattoo to the sun it can react with the healing ink and literally burn it from the inside out, so UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES expose your healing tattoo to prolonged direct sunlight.  Even a healed tattoo will fade when exposed to the sun or tanning beds with time, if you must expose your HEALED tattoo to those nasty UV rays be sure to use a high SPF SUNBLOCK (at least 30)

EXPOSURE TO TOXINS / BACTERIA – If you work/live in an environment with dirt and filth you run the risk of infection, nursing homes/hospitals, being around animals, toxic metals/chemicals, and filth of all kind can cause a SERIOUS infections, be smart and use common sense …. If you have a tattoo on your hand/forarm and you work on a farm or change a diaper you run the risk of an infection …. The possibilities are endless …….

DAMAGED SKIN – If your skin is week, sun damaged, thin, or an artist overworks the tattoo it will cause the tattoo to heal badly

ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO LATEX OR TATTOO PIGMENT – If you are allergic to latex you will more than likely know before you get your tattoo. Let the artist know, NITREL or VINYL gloves can be used… signs of allergic reactions are extreme rash/redness in the case of latex (gloves worn by the artist)

An allergic reaction to tattoo ink is VERY RARE but is possible, if you are allergic to a pigment it will be evident certain colors in your tattoo bubbling and raising off of your skin resembling a SEVERE scar. If you are concerned about having a reaction to tattoo ink ask your artist about doing a “prick test” where a small dot of each color to be used in your potential artwork is tattooed under your skin at least 24 hours before your tattoo …. If you have a lot of allergies sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry….

I hope this has helped, together we can make your tattoo/healing experience a good one and give you a beautiful piece of living artwork that will last a lifetime…

We will do our part by applying your tattoo to the best of our ability with artistic skill in a clean environment, now please do your part and TAKE CARE OF IT, If you have any questions never hesitate to ask that’s what we’re here for…WE CARE

http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=5502297&blogID=262323041


Comments are closed.

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

Visit our friends!

A few highly recommended friends...